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2 liter bottles for H2O storage
#1
Thoughts?  I have a couple dozen filled with tap water and no additional treatment.  Personally, I would drink that water without concern in an emergency no matter how old it was.  However I do have a wife and two kids to be concerned about.

Could I be doing it better while still using the 2 liter bottles?

I also like the fact that these make it easy to store the bottles.

[Image: pictureImage?seller=cwbylover01&ite=150495218728&seq=1]
Shodan, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.Anim_sniper2Zombieanimated
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#2
There's a lot of people that use 2liter bottles for storage.  They're good because they can be stacked on their side in shelves and you can fit a lot of them in.  Keep in mind about the weight.  For each gallon of water, you have 8lbs of weight.  Make sure whatever you're storing it on can hold the weight. 

Attached is a document that will give you some guidance on proper purification and the application of chlorine.


Attached Files
.pdf   Emergency disinfection drinking water.pdf (Size: 320.32 KB / Downloads: 11)
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#3
Thanks.  What would be the primary contaminant concern for my water stored this way?
Shodan, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.Anim_sniper2Zombieanimated
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#4
Bacteria that's left in the bottle when you fill it with water.  Small amounts of the nasties that are in regular tap water that aren't killed by the regular processing.  Much like poisons, it isn't really the bacteria that's there, the concentration of bacteria.  If there's only a very small amount of cryptosporidium in there, then you probably won't get sick, but if there's a lot, then you will get sick.  It's not the poison, it's the dose.

Before you store any water in resued jars, wash them out really good with hot water and anti-bacterial soap.  Make sure you do the cap too, if you can boil the cap for a few minutes before sealing it, that would probably be good too.  Add a some drops of clear chlorox as per the instructions I posted above and seal them up. 

One thing I recommend for anyone that's storing water long term, include some sugar free kool-aid in your supplies.  Add it to your drinking water when you open it, it'll help mask any residual taste of the chlorine.
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#5
(09-13-2012, 08:54 AM)Shodan Wrote: Thoughts?  I have a couple dozen filled with tap water and no additional treatment.  Personally, I would drink that water without concern in an emergency no matter how old it was.  However I do have a wife and two kids to be concerned about.

Could I be doing it better while still using the 2 liter bottles?

I also like the fact that these make it easy to store the bottles.

[Image: pictureImage?seller=cwbylover01&ite=150495218728&seq=1]

I have like 154 2 liter bottles of water here (plus other containers of various types), they work fine. Just make sure you rinse it out thoroughly before filling, and put the cap on REAL tight. In an emergency situation, just drop a capful of bleach in it and let it sit 24 hours before drinking. I also have 5 gallons of bleach on hand (and a stream around the corner)

My eventual goal is to have 365 of the two liter bottles on hand and filled.

PS: Old hot water heaters are awesome water storage tanks.
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#6
(09-13-2012, 09:59 AM)Valorius Wrote:
(09-13-2012, 08:54 AM)Shodan Wrote: Thoughts?  I have a couple dozen filled with tap water and no additional treatment.  Personally, I would drink that water without concern in an emergency no matter how old it was.  However I do have a wife and two kids to be concerned about.

Could I be doing it better while still using the 2 liter bottles?

I also like the fact that these make it easy to store the bottles.

[Image: pictureImage?seller=cwbylover01&ite=150495218728&seq=1]

I have like 154 2 liter bottles of water here (plus other containers of various types), they work fine. Just make sure you rinse it out thoroughly before filling, and put the cap on REAL tight. In an emergency situation, just drop a capful of bleach in it and let it sit 24 hours before drinking. I also have 5 gallons of bleach on hand (and a stream around the corner)

My eventual goal is to have 365 of the two liter bottles on hand and filled.

PS: Old hot water heaters are awesome water storage tanks.


You know that bleach has a limited shelf life?
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#7
Yes, 5 years if kept in a cool dark place. My GF uses my stash for laundry, so whenever she exhausts one, i get a new one. That way they're constantly rotated and should all be reasonably fresh should the worst come to pass.

I also have about a half dozen bottles of purification tablets too, and a brita water jug with a case of extra filters.

I should be good, unless i have to abandon everything.

For emergency get out now rations i have twelve 2 liters of water and 12 cans of food in a duffel bag in the garage. There's also a can opener, a bottle of purification tablets, a bottle of iodide and a first aid kit in there too. Oh, and my cousin gave me some old government CD radiation detectors as well. So that way i don't have to wonder if i'm fucked, i'll know for sure. Smile
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#8
Do you have a citation on the 5 years?  Everything I read said 6 to 9 months, a year at the most, even stored in a cool place.

Water treatment plants that use Sodium Hypochlorite for purification have themselves set to get refilled about every 3 to 4 months, because after that, it starts to crystallize and is ineffective.  I'm just curious where you heard 5 years.
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#9
Clorox bleach can be stored at temperatures between 50 and 70 degrees F for about six months without losing potency, according to "Survival Topics.com." After this time, bleach does start to degrade at a rate of 20 percent each year. 

Read more: How long does clorox bleach last? | Answerbag
 http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/1962129#ixzz26N91D4ly

Ergo: 5 years.
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#10
Ok, you found one reference that cites a blog that no longer has the original information on it.

Whereas if you google for "Shelf life of bleach" everything says 6 to 9 months, a year on the outside, and after that it's ineffective.

If you want to trust your health to 5 year old bleach, more power to you.  But I don't think it's something wise to do.

Even Chlorox's manufacturer doesn't recommend using it past 1 year of manufacture date.

For long term storage of a product like this, someone recommended Pool Shock, which is a good idea because it's already crystallized and can be stored for longer times, but long term stored liquid bleach isn't something I'd want to bet my life on.

What you can do is add some bleach to your water before you put it away on the shelf, it should kill anything that's left inside the bottle coming from the tap.  If you're still not sure about the water when you go to use it, you could boil it or filter it or both.
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