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2017 Garden thread
#1
Has anyone even started yet?
My heirloom seeds are sprouting and I'm starting to think maybe I started a little too early.  At this rate I may have to build a small green house because in a couple of weeks they will need to be in something bigger than the starter pods.
After scaling back last year and now having more empty jars than full ones I'm going for broke and planting a big garden this year.
I need to get stocked back up.
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#2
I used to do a fair sized garden just so I could get something, if not much, from it.  No matter what I did to protect it the critters got most of it (deer, rabbits, skunks, coons, squirrels, chipmunks, et al, except for hogs, they get shot on sight so I don't have a problem with them Wink )

This year I'm going to do some container gardening, saw on facebook a great way to do potatoes so I'll try that and do large flower pots of tomatoes so I can cover them easily to keep them from getting eaten.  We grow fresh herbs but do them indoors as we don't need a lot and the excess I freeze or dry and grind then freeze (keeps them pretty fresh).  Leaf lettuce I grow in 12" x 36" planters on the back deck and can cover them pretty easily, same with radishes (love icicle radishes) and carrots.
Xringshooter, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#3
We started our tomatoes, peppers and herbs. Lettuce has been popping up for the last month, outside. Not sure if it's going to make it thu this last storm. (Good thing I proof read prior to adding post. 'Peppers' was autocorrected to 'perverts'. ?)  We have those year round in this house.  Tongue
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#4
    • God: Hey St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the Midwest? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect "no maintenance" garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honey bees and flocks of songbirds. I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.
    • St. Francis: It's the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers "weeds" and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.
    • God: Grass? But it's so boring. It's not colorful. It doesn't attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It's temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?
    • St. Francis: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. The begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.
    • God: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.
    • St. Francis: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it... sometimes twice a week.
    • God: They cut it? Do they then bail it like hay?
    • St. Francis: Not exactly, Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags
    • .God: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?
    • St. Francis: No Sir. Just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.
    • God: Now let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?
    • St. Francis: Yes, Sir.
    • God: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.
    • St. Francis: You are not going to believe this Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.
    • God: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stroke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It's a natural circle of life.
    • St. Francis: You better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.
    • God: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?
    • St. Francis: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. The haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.
    • God: And where do they get this mulch?
    • St. Francis: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.
    • God: Enough. I don't want to think about this anymore. 
    • Sister Catherine, you're in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?
    • Sister Catherine: "Dumb and Dumber", Lord. It's a real stupid movie about.....
    • God: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis.
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#5
(03-18-2017, 08:24 AM)spblademaker Wrote: We started our tomatoes, peppers and herbs. Lettuce has been popping up for the last month, outside. Not sure if it's going to make it thu this last storm. (Good thing I proof read prior to adding post. 'Peppers' was autocorrected to 'perverts'. ?)  We have those year round in this house.  Tongue

Here in the West end of Monroe Co. we are still buried under snow. 

I did take advantage of the spring-like weather in February to transplant a few young saplings, but things are on hold until we thaw out.  I also need to prune my apple tree and a couple of silver maples.

I have an over abundance of heirloom asparagus crowns that I would be willing to part with.  Perhaps we could work a trade.

The winter rye I planted as cover crop last year is looking good and I am eager to get my hands in the soil again.
twoguns, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#6
My garlic and chives started without me a couple weeks ago. Now they're covered in snow.
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