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9Cr14MoV or AUS8?
#1
I know it all comes down to heat treatment, but in general, which is better: 9Cr14MoV or AUS8?

I'm looking at the Ontario RAT 1 (with serrations) and a few Schrade models (mostly similar to the Schrade Tactical Utility Folding 3.5" 9Cr18MoV Spear Point Combo Blade, Black G10 Handles).
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#2
Ummmm,


Banana?Shrug
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#3
Mr_Gixxer;141715 Wrote:Ummmm,


Banana?Shrug

Eaxctly, they're two different metals used to make the knife blades.
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#4
Philadelphia Patriot;141716 Wrote:
Mr_Gixxer;141715 Wrote:Ummmm,


Banana?Shrug

Eaxctly, they're two different metals used to make the knife blades.

I didn't mean any offense, that's literally the scope of my knowledge when it comes to knives. I'd like to learn more though!
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#5
Mr_Gixxer;141717 Wrote:
Philadelphia Patriot;141716 Wrote:Eaxctly, they're two different metals used to make the knife blades.

I didn't mean any offense, that's literally the scope of my knowledge when it comes to knives. I'd like to learn more though!

Hahaha, trust me, no offense taken. Yeah, I'm really clueless in this field.
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#6
I would go with the Ontario just because I have one of their bigger knives but Im in the same boat has you. Jah is the resident knife guy, maybe shoot him a PM.
das, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#7
All I know is SOG uses AUS8.
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#8
Based on what I have read, they are pretty comparably. Both are probably made in China. That being said, I also hate stainless.

Sorry. The Ontario is made in Taiwan.
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#9
I was doing some reading as well, here's what I found...

Quote:AUSx series
The AUS stainless steel series is produced by Aichi Steel Corporation, Japan. They differ from the AISI 4xx series because they have vanadium added to them. Vanadium improves the wear resistance, toughness, and ease of sharpening.[7]

AUS-6 (6A) is comparable to 440A with a carbon content close to 0.65%.[7] It is a low cost steel, slightly higher wear resistance compared to 420J.
AUS-8 (8A) is comparable to 440B with a carbon content close to 0.75%.[7] AUS-8 is often used instead of 440C.[7] SOG knives uses AUS-8 extensively.
AUS-10 (10A) is comparable to 440C with a carbon content close to 1.10%.[7] It is slightly tougher than 440C.

and...

Quote:Mo/MoV series
Chinese and American stainless steels; the manufacturers are unknown with the exception of 14-4CrMo which is manufactured by Latrobe Specialty Metals.
(sorted by first number.)

3CR13MoV A Chinese steel; made by adding molybdenum and vanadium to the 420J2-3Cr13 formula.
5Cr13MoV It is similar to 5Cr15MoV, the hardness could be HRC 56-58. It is widely used to make high-end scissors, folding knives and hunting knives etc.
6CR12MoV It is also similar to 6Cr14MoV, 6Cr14 which are also created by Ahonest Changjiang Stainless steel Co.,Ltd.
They are produced as per customers' requests. For 6Cr14MoV grade, the hardness could be HRC 60. It is good at making razors, surgical instruments.

7CR13MoV The big difference between 7Cr13MoV and 7Cr17MoV is the content of chromium. 7Cr13MoV has less tensile strength, hardness and resistance to wear when compared with 7Cr17MoV.
7CR17MoV A Chinese stainless steel compared to 440A.
8CR13MoV A Chinese stainless steel tempered at the Rc56 to Rc58 range and used in Spyderco's, Kershaw's, and other quality knife maker's budget lines of knives. For example, Kershaw's Crown II is one of the few "name brand steel" folders that can be had for under $20 (in 2013). 8CR13MoV is often talked about in terms of a high-end budget steel. Early Byrd (the Spyderco budget line) 8CR13MoV knives were marked 440C, but tests found that the steel was something entirely different from American 440C. According to Sal Glesser, owner of Spyderco, this steel was closer to AUS-8 (AUS8) than American 440C.[32] 8CR13MoV is often compared to AUS-8 and 440B,[33] but it has slightly more Carbon.
8CR14MoV A Chinese steel with similar performance characteristics to AUS-8. An excellent value priced steel for its performance.
9Cr18Mo A higher end Chinese stainless steel used mostly in high-end barbering scissors and surgical tools.
14-4CrMo Manufactured by Latrobe Specialty Metals. A wear resistant, martensitic stainless tool steel that exhibits better corrosion resistance than type 440C stainless steel.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_blade_materials
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#10
The big thing for the end user is simply rust resistance. AUS8 should be coated and may need some light maintenance. If you are planning on a lot of outdoor use in humid conditions, steels with chromium tend to be more rust resistant.

Check out the videos by NutnFancy. I have an Aus8 coated knife and I am very pleased with its strength and edge retention.

Blades made with 5160 are a lot tougher, but also need some type of coating or light oiling. It's all very complex because it depends on steel source, heat treat, finish, and intended use.
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