pa2a.org


Share Thread:  
Any heart attack survivors?
#1
Two and a half years ago, after a week or two of angina pains and at the age of 51, I developed the sensation of an elephant in spiked heels jumping on my chest. Thank goddess my girlfriend was at my house, and that my house is 1 mile with only one traffic light from the Doylestown Heart Institute. A half hour later, I had a stent in my lower anterior descending coronary artery. A day or two later I went home with the good news that there appeared to be no permanent damage to my heart muscle.

Thus began a long journey to a level of fitness I'd never known before.

There is, I am told, a class of heart-attack survivors who respond by becoming "cardio-jocks." I guess I'm one of those.

I went to the excellent Phase 2 cardiac rehab for 90 days (thank god for good insurance) where I wore a remote EKG while learning the proper way to exercise and just starting to scratch around getting in shape.

Now, I occasionally run the one mile to the Phase 2 gym to say "hi" to the coaches there and to remind them of why they work so hard for so little pay.

Since, I've been in Phase 3 on and off, with stints at LA Fitness.

When I started, I was about 11 percent overweight. But the kicker was that my percentage of body fat was headed for 30 percent. All fat, no muscle. Now I'm headed for 12 percent body fat, and right on my ideal weight.

My BP was very high--- around 160/95 at rest.

Now it's close to 120/80 even without meds. I often leave the gym at around 80/50!

My resting heart rate used to be around 85.

Now it's as low as 38.

I celebrated the six month anniversary of the "event" by completing the Philly Fight for Air Climb, 1080 steps up 3 Logan Square in Philadelphia, in about 14 minutes. I marked 1 1/2 years by doing the same in 11:49.

Won't be going this year, as I'm still trying to get my "wind" back from this respiratory bug that went around. Maybe the one in the Fall.

Personal best on the stair mill is 1080 steps in 8:32.

I'm a very strong believer in monitoring heart rates. I use a Polar T31 coded belt and a watch to keep my heart rate at or above 80% of age-predicted maximum.

I can kick most 25-year-olds' butts doing most things, except distance running; the old bones just don't like the pounding the pavement gives 'em, even in the best shoes going.

Oh, and I'm wearing the same size Levis I did when I was a skinny kid. Bigger shirts though--- for the shoulders, not the belly. The beach-ball I had under my shirt is gone.

Naturally the diet has changed, a lot. Fortunately, I never smoked.

I've found that a session at the range seems to have the effect of lowering BP that a gym session does. Similarly, I find that a session at the gym vastly improves range performance.

So if you've had a heart attack, get to work. You can do this thing.

If you've haven't, and you're worried, first get looked at by your doctor and then get to work before it happens. Chances are if you are worried you have reason to be.

You can't change your genes, but you can change your jeans size, and other lifestyle factors.
gascolator, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Nov 2012.
Reply
#2
Had mine 9 years ago in April, right at the end of the first round of the Stanley Cup playoffs. Still having a hard time fighting the weight, but I keep trying. I had been doing some martial arts last year but then I blew out my back and in January picked up that bug you're talking about. As soon as I get the bug out of the system it will be back to class for at least 3 hours each week and some NordicTrak on off days. I will win my weight battle this year, I just need a little help with the diet, more on the qty side than the healthful food side. Unlike you I was a smoker, but I haven't touched a stick since that day.
[Image: member955.png]
USAF (1976 -1986) NRA, GOA Anim_sniper2
"The problems we face today are there because the people who work for a living are outnumbered by those who vote for a living." Dan Cofall
Reply
#3
gascolator;83786 Wrote:Two and a half years ago, after a week or two of angina pains and at the age of 51, I developed the sensation of an elephant in spiked heels jumping on my chest. Thank goddess my girlfriend was at my house, and that my house is 1 mile with only one traffic light from the Doylestown Heart Institute. A half hour later, I had a stent in my lower anterior descending coronary artery. A day or two later I went home with the good news that there appeared to be no permanent damage to my heart muscle.

Thus began a long journey to a level of fitness I'd never known before.

There is, I am told, a class of heart-attack survivors who respond by becoming "cardio-jocks." I guess I'm one of those.

I went to the excellent Phase 2 cardiac rehab for 90 days (thank god for good insurance) where I wore a remote EKG while learning the proper way to exercise and just starting to scratch around getting in shape.

Now, I occasionally run the one mile to the Phase 2 gym to say "hi" to the coaches there and to remind them of why they work so hard for so little pay.

Since, I've been in Phase 3 on and off, with stints at LA Fitness.

When I started, I was about 11 percent overweight. But the kicker was that my percentage of body fat was headed for 30 percent. All fat, no muscle. Now I'm headed for 12 percent body fat, and right on my ideal weight.

My BP was very high--- around 160/95 at rest.

Now it's close to 120/80 even without meds. I often leave the gym at around 80/50!

My resting heart rate used to be around 85.

Now it's as low as 38.

I celebrated the six month anniversary of the "event" by completing the Philly Fight for Air Climb, 1080 steps up 3 Logan Square in Philadelphia, in about 14 minutes. I marked 1 1/2 years by doing the same in 11:49.

Won't be going this year, as I'm still trying to get my "wind" back from this respiratory bug that went around. Maybe the one in the Fall.

Personal best on the stair mill is 1080 steps in 8:32.

I'm a very strong believer in monitoring heart rates. I use a Polar T31 coded belt and a watch to keep my heart rate at or above 80% of age-predicted maximum.

I can kick most 25-year-olds' butts doing most things, except distance running; the old bones just don't like the pounding the pavement gives 'em, even in the best shoes going.

Oh, and I'm wearing the same size Levis I did when I was a skinny kid. Bigger shirts though--- for the shoulders, not the belly. The beach-ball I had under my shirt is gone.

Naturally the diet has changed, a lot. Fortunately, I never smoked.

I've found that a session at the range seems to have the effect of lowering BP that a gym session does. Similarly, I find that a session at the gym vastly improves range performance.

So if you've had a heart attack, get to work. You can do this thing.

If you've haven't, and you're worried, first get looked at by your doctor and then get to work before it happens. Chances are if you are worried you have reason to be.

You can't change your genes, but you can change your jeans size, and other lifestyle factors.

congratulations!

I'm down about 50 pounds myself and plan on ordering a gym set up tonight when I get home from work to get back into lifting weights like I used to be prior to having my spinal fusion in 2003.
[Image: quotes.php]
Reply
#4
A little young to be worried about a heart attack just now, but never to young to work on preventing one. I am trying to start running and exercising to get back into shape and hopefully I can keep with that. Still have a problem with my diet I just cant help that the best tasting foods are bad for you.
Reply
#5
The Hobbit;83830 Wrote:A little young to be worried about a heart attack just now, but never to young to work on preventing one. I am trying to start running and exercising to get back into shape and hopefully I can keep with that. Still have a problem with my diet I just cant help that the best tasting foods are bad for you.


Never to young. At 27 I had to have a stress test, and and a few other procedures. My dad has had several heart attacks, and has CHF. I was getting chest pains every few days, to the point I couldn't breathe.

Luckily, it turned out to be something completely different. But in today's society, where the extent of most peoples exercize is walking to the fridge, and their diet consists of pop and Doritos, it is important to be cautious.
This will be the best security for maintaining our liberties. A nation of well-informed men who have been taught to know and prize the rights which God has given them cannot be enslaved. It is in the religion of ignorance that tyranny begins. -Ben Franklin
Reply
#6
Connal;83833 Wrote:
The Hobbit;83830 Wrote:A little young to be worried about a heart attack just now, but never to young to work on preventing one. I am trying to start running and exercising to get back into shape and hopefully I can keep with that. Still have a problem with my diet I just cant help that the best tasting foods are bad for you.


Never to young. At 27 I had to have a stress test, and and a few other procedures. My dad has had several heart attacks, and has CHF. I was getting chest pains every few days, to the point I couldn't breathe.

Luckily, it turned out to be something completely different. But in today's society, where the extent of most peoples exercize is walking to the fridge, and their diet consists of pop and Doritos, it is important to be cautious.
Ask your Dr. for the full list of heart attack symptoms as well, you might be surprised at a number of them. I had no idea that regularly recurring heart burn was a symptom of anything other than GIRD. Turns out that it is one of the symptoms of heart disease/heart attack.
[Image: member955.png]
USAF (1976 -1986) NRA, GOA Anim_sniper2
"The problems we face today are there because the people who work for a living are outnumbered by those who vote for a living." Dan Cofall
Reply
#7
billamj;83839 Wrote:
Connal;83833 Wrote:Never to young. At 27 I had to have a stress test, and and a few other procedures. My dad has had several heart attacks, and has CHF. I was getting chest pains every few days, to the point I couldn't breathe.

Luckily, it turned out to be something completely different. But in today's society, where the extent of most peoples exercize is walking to the fridge, and their diet consists of pop and Doritos, it is important to be cautious.
Ask your Dr. for the full list of heart attack symptoms as well, you might be surprised at a number of them. I had no idea that regularly recurring heart burn was a symptom of anything other than GIRD. Turns out that it is one of the symptoms of heart disease/heart attack.

And that is the truly scary part. Everyone knows the pain part. Even the pain in the arm. But aside from that, there are likely millions of people who have had a minor heart attack, and not known about it.

That is the whole reason why I went to get checked. I will admit, a stress test isn't fun. But dieing of a heart attack before I'm 30? Yeah, I'll take the annoyances.
This will be the best security for maintaining our liberties. A nation of well-informed men who have been taught to know and prize the rights which God has given them cannot be enslaved. It is in the religion of ignorance that tyranny begins. -Ben Franklin
Reply
#8
Thankfully, I have avoided any myself, but as a side note my father had eleven (yes 11), before he died of cancer.
It's good to work to avoid a specific condition, but be sure to check your six, something may be coming up on you.
gf45acp, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Nov 2012.
Reply
#9
gf45acp;87142 Wrote:Thankfully, I have avoided any myself, but as a side note my father had eleven (yes 11), before he died of cancer.
It's good to work to avoid a specific condition, but be sure to check your six, something may be coming up on you.

That's a major message to you. You can change your jeans, but you can't change your genes. But you can change your behavior.

Fitness and a good diet aren't a single big decision.

They're a thousand little decisions over the course of every year.
gascolator, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Nov 2012.
Reply
#10
I had 1st heart attack at age 39 that one got me 3 stents. 2nd heart attack at 42 got me another stent. It can happen to anybody.
Shorty, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Nov 2012.
Reply








Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Software by MyBB, © 2002-2015 MyBB Group.
Template by Modogodo Design.