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Anyone else heat with wood?
#11
streaker69;34530 Wrote:
Valorius;34526 Wrote:I get all the free lumber i can take, but that's not optimal at all for long lasting heat, which is a big part of my problem i think.

You're not burning any PT in there are ya?

PT? Pressure treated? No, it's just regular old lumber scraps, not seen any of the pressure treated stuff in there. Just for shits and giggles, what's the problem with PT wood?
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#12
Another thing to consider if you're thinking of heating with wood is your home owner's insurance. Find out what their regulations are with respect to wood stoves and your coverage.

My parents heated their home primarily with wood for probably 20 years. They never had a problem. Then one day the home owner's insurance agent was in the house and saw the stove. He told them they had to have fireproof material installed on all sides of it, in some ridiculous amount of distance. If not, they would be dropped from the insurance. To comply, they would have had to cover over both windows in the room, and most of the room's floor would have to be the fireproof material, as well. It didn't matter that the stove was already sitting on fireproof material, or that the back wall where the pipe went through was already covered in a 4 foot wide, floor to ceiling piece of fireproof material.

They chose to just take the stove out, and have since build a detached garage, and put the stove there, in case Dad needs to work in the garage in the winter.

Valorius Wrote:I get all the free lumber i can take, but that's not optimal at all for long lasting heat, which is a big part of my problem i think.

I think that probably is your problem. Unless you're using a fireplace type setup where you don't have any way to restrict the airflow into the fire. Even the small wood stove my parents had, and others I've used at cabins, etc would keep overnight. If you filled them properly and cut down the airflow before going to bed.
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#13
Valorius;34690 Wrote:PT? Pressure treated? No, it's just regular old lumber scraps, not seen any of the pressure treated stuff in there. Just for shits and giggles, what's the problem with PT wood?

Here's some info: http://www.arboristsite.com/firewood-hea.../71229.htm

I believe that some PT also has formaldehyde in it, which is something else you really don't want to be burning.

I just started our woodstove for the first time this year to take the chill off. Within an hour the inside temp went up 6 degrees and it's still climbing. We also always put a large pan of water on top of a trivet on the woodstove. Otherwise it just dries the house out too much.
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#14
ivwarrior;34694 Wrote:
Valorius Wrote:I get all the free lumber i can take, but that's not optimal at all for long lasting heat, which is a big part of my problem i think.

I think that probably is your problem. Unless you're using a fireplace type setup where you don't have any way to restrict the airflow into the fire. Even the small wood stove my parents had, and others I've used at cabins, etc would keep overnight. If you filled them properly and cut down the airflow before going to bed.

It must be, because even when i close off almost all the air when the fire is freshly stoked and has a good base of hot coals, it only stays lit for maybe 3 hours.

From Streaker Link:

"Lots of info on the web. This caught my eye.
Burning:Incineration of CCA wood does not destroy arsenic. It is incredible, but a single 12 foot 2 x 6 contains about 27 grams of Arsenic - enough arsenic to kill 250 adults. Burning CCA wood releases the chemical bond holding Arsenic in the wood, and just one Tablespoon of ash from a CCA wood fire contains a lethal dose of Arsenic. Worse yet, Arsenic gives no warning: it does not have a specific taste or odor to warn you of its presence. No one disputes that the ash from burning CCA wood is highly toxic: It is illegal to burn CCA wood in all 50 states. This has serious implications for firefighters, cleanup and landfill operations.
Even more astonishing, minute amounts of 'fly ash' from burning CCA pressure treated wood, can have serious health consequences. The Journal of the American Medical Association reported on a family that burned CCA in a wood stove for winter heating. Their hair fell out, all family members suffered severe, recurring nosebleeds, extreme fatigue and debilitating headaches. The parents complained about 'blacking out' for periods of several hours, followed by long periods of extreme disorientation. Both children suffered frequent seizures described as 'grand mal'. The symptoms were finally traced to breathing minute amounts of arsenic laden dust leaking from the furnace as fly ash. The family's houseplants and fish died, too, victims of copper poisoning from the same dust. Peters HA, et al: Seasonal exposure to arsenic from burning CCA wood. JAMA 25118)2393-96, 1984)"

----

I've certainly never had any of those symptoms! o.O

Pressure treated wood is stamped as such, yes?

Post 2003 update:

"Pressure-treated wood has gone through a pressurization process where chemicals are infused into the wood to protect against infestation and rot. Prior to 2003, many pressure-treated woods were treated with chromate copper arsenate (CCA), which contains the carcinogen arsenic. Because arsenic is dangerous to humans, it is important to refrain from burning treated wood or from placing treated wood near growing vegetables. Even though the wood industry voluntarily stopped treating wood with CCA in 2003, there is still a large amount of CCA-treated wood in use. That's why it's important to test wood that you are unsure about before you burn it or build with it."

Read more: How to Identify Pressure-Treated Wood | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_6564152_identify...z2BAXsWrlu
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#15
Valorius;34703 Wrote:
ivwarrior;34694 Wrote:I think that probably is your problem. Unless you're using a fireplace type setup where you don't have any way to restrict the airflow into the fire. Even the small wood stove my parents had, and others I've used at cabins, etc would keep overnight. If you filled them properly and cut down the airflow before going to bed.

It must be, because even when i close off almost all the air when the fire is freshly stoked and has a good base of hot coals, it only stays lit for maybe 3 hours.

Do you adjust the air intake into your stove or just leave it wide open? Mine has a flap that can be adjusted by a screw. But limiting the amount of O2 back into the stove you can adjust how hot and long it burns.

But granted, dimensional lumber won't burn for very long. Many times I split up some 2x4 scrap to use as kindling because it burns fast and hot enough to get the bigger logs going.

If you had access to a truck, you could take a trip out here and get a cord of nice wood for about $150.

ETA: I didn't see that you said you close off the air, disregard the first part of my post.
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#16
I don't have a truck, and the lumber yard is literally 6 blocks from my house. So the financial incentive to use the free lumber scraps is very high.

PS, the yard where i get it has a sign saying "Free fire wood", so they know what the stuff is being used for, so the risk of running into pressure treated wood should be pretty low.
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#17
As I've said in the past heating with wood is a lot of hard work that never semms to end, but damn it's worth it.

Fired it up last weekend, and most likely won't be shutting it off until
late April.

I buy pole wood straight off the logging truck for about $600.
Lasts about 2 1/2yrs. Getting tough to get though.
Welcome to ObamaNation part deuxUtg
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#18
Firewood has been our primary heat source for over 35 years. In the Spring & Fall we'll use our baseboard heat because the woodstove is a bit too much, but from late Oct/ early Nov the stove is fired up & stays burning until sometime in April.

I've had a Vermont Stoveworks cast iron stove for the last 14 years & it heats our 120+ year old farmhouse just fine. In fact, we occasionally have to open a window.

I cut some of my own wood, but the majority of it comes from a sawmill owner back the road that has been selling it to me for years. He'll cut/split & deliver it to me for $110/cord. We burn 4 cords a year & I always keep an extra years supply on hand.

If you're new to woodburning, HAVE YOUR CHIMNEY, (Plus the thimble & wall pass-thru), INSPECTED FIRST. If it's an old one, it probably needs relined. Don't take the chance on burning down your house, or worse, just to save a few bucks on heating oil.
"It's hard to imagine a more stupid or dangerous way of making decisions, than to put those decisions in the hands of those who pay no price for being wrong."
Thomas Sowell
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#19
For you guys that have wood stoves, how often do you replace the door gasket? I just replaced mine last year after seeing how badly frayed it was. It was surprisingly easy to do. I just pulled the door of, used a putty knife to scrap the old one out, then a wire brush to clean the rest. Glued the new one in. Total time a little less than an hour.
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#20
Just did mine a few weeks ago. First time in 8 or 9 years.
Probably should do it every year or two though.

It's on my prep list to keep an extra length, and an extra door glass.
Some day I'm hoping to find a piece of metal to replace the glass in an emergency.
Welcome to ObamaNation part deuxUtg
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