pa2a.org


Share Thread:  
Anyone used these paper bricks?
#1
I've been reading lately where people are taking their non-clay-coated junk mail shredding it up into little bits, putting it and water and pressing them into bricks with a bottle jack or something similar then leaving them to dry. I've just moved into a house with a fireplace, and I'm not crazy about the notion of buying seasoned firewood at $200 a cord. When I was a kid my family would take turns keeping the fire going almost every day all winter, because the heater we had was too weak to make the house comfortable by itself. I want to burn like crazy this winter to save on energy costs. I can get about a half cord of 1 year old seasoned wood and a half cord of wet wood I just split today. I'll have plenty of wood for next year, but this year with the amount I plan to burn, I'm going to come up really short I estimate I'm going to need at least 2-3 cords total.  These paper bricks are supposed to dry much faster than regular logs so I'm thinking since I have basically infinite access to free paper to make bricks I could supplement the small amount of seasoned wood I have with these paper bricks until the wood I'm splitting now is seasoned for next year. 

Has anyone attempted to make some of these paper bricks? How long will they realistically burn for and what are your overall impressions of these? Can you burn them by themselves? Has anyone found any strategies to make them last longer? Is there any concern with chimney build up using these? I imagine not...

For those who don't know what I'm talking about...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iv26VAWTsiE
The forum poster formerly known as Emoticon...
Reply
#2
One of the people on Doomsday Preppers was show doing that, and the showed them burning it.  Considering how over dramatized that show was it's hard to say if what was said in the show was truthful about the burn time or the heat.

I've considered building a jig to make them just to see how well they do.  I'm sure I probably have most of what is needed in my garage to build it. Wink
Reply
#3
I was doing some more reading on these and stumbled across how in the UK now they have "smokeless free zones" in the UK where you are no longer allowed to have fireplace fires...As bad as things are here I am still glad I don't live in the UK which is another 10 years ahead of us in terms of the police state. 

http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/smoke-cont...r-act.html 

I just shake my head...

The consensus on these paper bricks is that they burn about 15-20 minutes depending on composition and they create a lot of ash. I think regardless I'm going to build a form and a press just to see. Free fuel is free fuel so even if they don't work perfectly it's hard to argue with free. I think if you used a 2 ton jack versus human leverage you could increase the density to the point they might compete with a low grade wood log.
The forum poster formerly known as Emoticon...
Reply
#4
Just remember though, you cannot use the smooth type of magazine paper in this or else you will end up with a chimney fire eventually as the creosote will build up.  News Print, paper bags from stores, things like that should be ok, but not the magazines.
Reply
#5
Seems interesting, but I'd be really worried about creosote build-up if you burned a lot of it. I'd assume that it burns similarly to soft wood, but that's just a guess. Also seems like a lot more work than just going out into the woods with a chainsaw.
Reply
#6
(09-14-2012, 03:26 PM)bac0nfat Wrote: Seems interesting, but I'd be really worried about creosote build-up if you burned a lot of it. I'd assume that it burns similarly to soft wood, but that's just a guess. Also seems like a lot more work than just going out into the woods with a chainsaw.

I'd consider this for maybe a campfire "starter" but that's about it. I'm with you, my concern would be creosote and the damn stuff burning to quickly. There is plenty of firewood in pa, I don't really see the benefit.
I love Glocks... I don't know why ?? ShrugShrug
Reply
#7
(09-14-2012, 03:26 PM)bac0nfat Wrote: Seems interesting, but I'd be really worried about creosote build-up if you burned a lot of it. I'd assume that it burns similarly to soft wood, but that's just a guess. Also seems like a lot more work than just going out into the woods with a chainsaw.


Like I said I'll have plenty of wood for next year, but nothing I split now will be good until next burning season by itself. I'm looking for sources that I can burn for this year. Previously, had nowhere to store split wood, but now I do have space, but I'm starting from 0.
The forum poster formerly known as Emoticon...
Reply
#8
(09-14-2012, 03:44 PM)Emoticon Wrote:
(09-14-2012, 03:26 PM)bac0nfat Wrote: Seems interesting, but I'd be really worried about creosote build-up if you burned a lot of it. I'd assume that it burns similarly to soft wood, but that's just a guess. Also seems like a lot more work than just going out into the woods with a chainsaw.


Like I said I'll have plenty of wood for next year, but nothing I split now will be good until next burning season by itself. I'm looking for sources that I can burn for this year. Previously, had nowhere to store split wood, but now I do have space, but I'm starting from 0.


Have you ever burned wood before? Are you using wood as your primary heating source? Be prepared to burn at least a wheel barrel full of good, seasoned hardwood per day. I can only imagine that "paper logs" will burn twice as fast, and probably require two wheel barrels worth each day. Are you ready to make that many paper logs? Do you have enough paper to make that many logs? Do you have enough bins to soak the paper in for 2-3 days? It just seems like a huge project with lots of work for not much benefit. You are honestly better off shelling out the 200 bucks for proper wood. Just my opinion.
Reply
#9
By the way, if your fireplace doesn't already have it, I would really look into getting a wood stove insert for it. It will make it WAY more efficient, and distribute more of the heat into the house than up the chimney.
Reply
#10
There was an episode of Doomsday Preppers where a suburban family used old newspapers to do the same thing. They used a length of PVC pipe with holes drilled in it as a mold and I believe a hydraulic jack to compress it. What they ended up with were little paper pucks to burn. I was trying to find a video to post but couldn't. Maybe someone else can find the video and post it to show you an alternative to the device on the above video.
sleeper78, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
Reply








Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Software by MyBB, © 2002-2015 MyBB Group.
Template by Modogodo Design.