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Apple Trees - How much work?
#1
So after the events with our sewer, and the fact that we hate cleaning up sweet gum balls we're seriously considering cutting down the tree in the front yard this year. What we'd like to do is replace it and the dying dogwood with a pair of dwarf apple trees.

I told this plan to my mother, who's father had fruit trees all his life and she says that fruit trees are a lot of work if you actually want to get fruit from them. So I'm looking for advice from those that have them already. How much work is involved, and how difficult is it to keep them nice to get fruit?

Any advice on species to get and care would be appreciated.
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#2
I had two that came with my house and I cut them down because they were a pain, and they blocked my shooting range. That being said, they were way overgrown when I got them, so it might be easier if you do it right from the start. When they get overgrown, they produce a lot of small apples that aren't good for much except attracting bees and other insects.

I believe you will need both a male and female tree if you want it to produce fruit.

One positive (for some people) is they attract deer like crazy. That could also be a negative.

Sorry if that's not much help.
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#3
I just planted two apple trees last spring. I have a Red Delicious and a Granny Smith sapling. It'll be a few years until I get apples on them though. From what I've read they need to be pruned and pruned hard once they start maturing. Another thing is make sure you don't have any walnut trees close by because they will kill most apple trees that I'm aware of. At least far enough away that you aren't over a walnut root system or where the walnuts fall down. Other than that I don't have much else in the way of advice to offer yet. I'm kind of new at it myself. We had cherry trees and pear trees growing up.

One thing is for sure, if you let a fruit tree grow out of control they won't produce enough quality fruit if many at all.
[Image: picsay-1358258813.jpg]
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#4
I haven't seen a walnut tree anywhere in my neighborhood, and I'm glad, those things are just about as messy as my Sweet gum tree. I think the closest walnut tree I can think of is at least 4 miles.
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#5
Just remembered, red cedar trees can give you some major problems too. Look up cedar apple rust.
[Image: picsay-1358258813.jpg]
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#6
Here are some good words of advice: Dig a $20 hole for a $5 tree.
I did that for my dwarf peaches and it paid off.
NRA Life Member, NRA Certified Instructor:  HFS, Pistol, Rifle, PPIH,PPOH
Suarez Combat Arms Instructor School
Admit nothing.  Deny everything. Demand proof.
If we lie to the government, it's a crime. If the government lies to the people, it's called politics.
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#7
spblademaker;140090 Wrote:Here are some good words of advice: Dig a $20 hole for a $5 tree.
I did that for my dwarf peaches and it paid off.

OK, prostitute jokes aside, what is a $20 hole? How can digging a hole cost anything other than a little sweat equity?
Ammunition, it's the new lead bullion. Buy it cheap and stack it deep.
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#8
It just means that you should not skimp on the hole that you dig for your trees. The better root system they can build and nutrients they can get, the better off. Most of the ground up here is rock. When we plant our trees we spend a good deal of time making certain that as many rocks as possible are removed and we backfill with good soil and compost.
NRA Life Member, NRA Certified Instructor:  HFS, Pistol, Rifle, PPIH,PPOH
Suarez Combat Arms Instructor School
Admit nothing.  Deny everything. Demand proof.
If we lie to the government, it's a crime. If the government lies to the people, it's called politics.
Paying for welfare is slavery.
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#9
spblademaker;140098 Wrote:It just means that you should not skimp on the hole that you dig for your trees. The better root system they can build and nutrients they can get, the better off. Most of the ground up here is rock. When we plant our trees we spend a good deal of time making certain that as many rocks as possible are removed and we backfill with good soil and compost.

OK, that makes sense. I usually dig a hole that's twice the diameter and twice the depth of the root ball of whatever I'm planting and backfill with a 50/50 mix of bagged garden soil and native soil. I haven't heard any complaints from my plants.
Ammunition, it's the new lead bullion. Buy it cheap and stack it deep.
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#10
Ill bet for a good apple tree from scratch it's a good idea to go at least 3 foot in diameter and 3 feet deep and mix up the perfect soil. Which means you should rent a backhoe and plant a lot at one time. Oh and call ms. Utility.
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