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Building your own children's toys
#1
My family including siblings and whatnot is undergoing quite an expansion at the moment. As of late I notice most of the kids for birthdays and Christmas are getting various plastic, decal'd to the hilt play sets which require batteries that the kids only show a passing interest in and don't seem to last long before something breaks on them. I can't help but wonder with some of these things leave so little to the imagination that they stifle creativity. My nephew is currently obsessed with the wooden Brio trains and I'm considering investing in a set of router bits to turn out all the pieces he wants and let him watch me make them to actually get an into to how these things are made and how not everything the kid wants needs to come from the store:

(See bottom of the page)

http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_..._bull.html

I also recently saw a toy crane with working pulleys and things at Pottery Barn Kids that I recently photographed in the store intend to copy for him as well:

http://www.potterybarnkids.com/products/...ion-crane/

When I was young one of my favorite toys was a biplane my grandfather literally whittled with a folding pocket knife and then painted out of a box of cedar shingles left over from a roofing job as I sat an watched. I find that these sorts of homemade toys tend to carry more meaning and survive though multiple generations of abuse as well as motivate the kids to actually use their imaginations which seems lacking in kids today. Unfortunately my whittling never progressed passed a 3rd grade level or so Tongue. Even still, I've got a fairly stocked woodworking shop in my garage minus a lathe and a thickness planer. Has anyone here made any toys or things of that nature for the younger ones in their families or have any ideas they'd like to share? For boys or girls it doesn't matter. I have a new niece-in-law that I would like to make something for, but I am currently drawing a blank on what to work up as well.

Funny side note: When my grandfather finished making the biplane for me he took me around the neighborhood in his pickup truck (with no car seat) and had me hold my arm out the window of the moving car with the plane *gasp* at around 20 or 30mph so I could feel the effect of the wind on the wings and watch the propeller spin. Today such "negligence" would probably be considered some form of child abuse. Rolleyes

Thanks!
The forum poster formerly known as Emoticon...
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#2
When I was a young girl, I used cardboard boxes of varying shapes, markers and paint, a knife and tape to make appliances, doll beds, etc. for my younger siblings to play with. Fabric, stuffing, and glue allowed me to make dollhouse furniture, etc. I had as much fun creating them as my they had in playing with them. I enjoyed doing the same with my kids. Even today, my youngest will call me and ask me for ideas to do with her kids. She calls me the toilet tissue tube queen - I can come up with a craft idea for almost anything with them. Smile The original recycle/reuse.


Emoticon;130143 Wrote:My family including siblings and whatnot is undergoing quite an expansion at the moment. As of late I notice most of the kids for birthdays and Christmas are getting various plastic, decal'd to the hilt play sets which require batteries that the kids only show a passing interest in and don't seem to last long before something breaks on them. I can't help but wonder with some of these things leave so little to the imagination that they stifle creativity. My nephew is currently obsessed with the wooden Brio trains and I'm considering investing in a set of router bits to turn out all the pieces he wants and let him watch me make them to actually get an into to how these things are made and how not everything the kid wants needs to come from the store:

(See bottom of the page)

http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_..._bull.html

I also recently saw a toy crane with working pulleys and things at Pottery Barn Kids that I recently photographed in the store intend to copy for him as well:

http://www.potterybarnkids.com/products/...ion-crane/

When I was young one of my favorite toys was a biplane my grandfather literally whittled with a folding pocket knife and then painted out of a box of cedar shingles left over from a roofing job as I sat an watched. I find that these sorts of homemade toys tend to carry more meaning and survive though multiple generations of abuse as well as motivate the kids to actually use their imaginations which seems lacking in kids today. Unfortunately my whittling never progressed passed a 3rd grade level or so Tongue. Even still, I've got a fairly stocked woodworking shop in my garage minus a lathe and a thickness planer. Has anyone here made any toys or things of that nature for the younger ones in their families or have any ideas they'd like to share? For boys or girls it doesn't matter. I have a new niece-in-law that I would like to make something for, but I am currently drawing a blank on what to work up as well.

Funny side note: When my grandfather finished making the biplane for me he took me around the neighborhood in his pickup truck (with no car seat) and had me hold my arm out the window of the moving car with the plane *gasp* at around 20 or 30mph so I could feel the effect of the wind on the wings and watch the propeller spin. Today such "negligence" would probably be considered some form of child abuse. Rolleyes

Thanks!
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#3
[Image: Little6003.jpg]


Emoticon's yearbook photo.

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#4
Emptymag, that made me laugh!

Seriously though I wish someone would create a medium sized toy mower. All the toy mowers are for 3 year olds but my 6 year old still likes to play mow. (My 8 year old finally real-mows).
Error 396: Signature cannot be found.
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#5
we gave the grandson a erector set with battery powered motors and he builds something different everyday. they make a expansion pack for it that will double the amount of items he can create. the tablet was a big hit and the only app he wanted was minecraft. between the two it is causing him to use his imagination more to design and build things.
better for him to do that than to sit around watching tv
"Fighting for peace is like screwing for virginity"

goofin, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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