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Canned food study
#1
Canned Food will last much longer than you may realize. The shelf life as posted on the can is deceiving in this regard. The date on the can does not mean it’s the date at which the food inside will suddenly turn to an unhealthful glop. Think about it for a minute… the process of professionally canned foods ensures that bacteria has been ‘baked out’. The fact that the can itself is sealed tight also ensures that nothing can get in to change the condition of the contents. Here are a few studies which support the notion that canned foods last much longer than the date that’s printed on the can…

http://modernsurvivalblog.com/survival-k...e-studies/
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#2
Canned food has been recovered from arctic expeditions that was approx 100 years old. When opened and tested back in Jolly Old England, the food was all still good.
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#3
Valorius;42286 Wrote:Canned food has been recovered from arctic expeditions that was approx 100 years old. When opened and tested back in Jolly Old England, the food was all still good.

Got a citation for food that was recovered? The only thing I recall being recovered was whiskey from Shackleton's expedition in 1907.

http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/02...le-dug-up/

Not saying it's not possible but improbable, but the whiskey survived because it didn't freeze and burst the bottles it was in. But canned food would still have liquid inside and that would freeze and burst the cans.
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#4
The date on cans is a "best by" date.
The only thing you will lose over extended storage is nutrition.
Stored in a cool dark place canned goods will maintain their nutrition far beyond the date on the can.

Of course if you are a diligent prepper you will rotate your stock within a few years.Wink
Welcome to ObamaNation part deuxUtg
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#5
To what end? to just waste money?

Buy it, store it right, and never, ever touch it again. Smile
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#6
I'll save the canned goods from over 100 years when desperation sets in, thank you.

Also, one other nitpick that must be mentioned: much of what was recovered was brandied, which means that there is some amount of alcohol content which no doubt improves the longevity of the food in question.

That isn't to say that there isn't some encouragement that food may last longer than the date on the can, but I would still be very cautious. In a SHTF scenario where you need to rely on decades old canned goods, you do NOT want to risk food poisoning or botulism.

Valorius;42303 Wrote:To what end? to just waste money?

Buy it, store it right, and never, ever touch it again. Smile

IMHO, with very few exceptions you should store what you eat regularly. You need to buy food anyway, store what you like and rotate the older with the newer so that you always have the stuff that will last longer without having to baby it.
Vampire pig man since September 2012
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#7
streaker69;42299 Wrote:
Valorius;42286 Wrote:Canned food has been recovered from arctic expeditions that was approx 100 years old. When opened and tested back in Jolly Old England, the food was all still good.

Got a citation for food that was recovered? The only thing I recall being recovered was whiskey from Shackleton's expedition in 1907.

http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/02...le-dug-up/

Not saying it's not possible but improbable, but the whiskey survived because it didn't freeze and burst the bottles it was in. But canned food would still have liquid inside and that would freeze and burst the cans.

The very first hit on google:

"Revised Dec. 21, 2009

"THE GREAT INTERNATIONAL SEARCH FOR NEW TERRITORY further propelled the use and notoriety of the can. Likewise, the advantages of well preserved canned food enabled bolder expeditions. Explorers in search of the elusive Northwest Passage, such as Otto von Kotzebue of Russia, were quick to benefit. He wrote of a "discovery made lately in England" which he thought "too important not to be made use of," and took some canned meats with him on his voyage in 1815.

Sir William Edward Parry made two arctic expeditions to the Northwest Passage in the 1820's and took canned provisions on his journeys. One four-pound tin of roasted veal, carried on both trips but never opened, was kept as an artifact of the expedition in a museum until it was opened in 1938. The contents, then over one hundred years old, were chemically analyzed and found to have kept most of their nutrients and to be in fairly perfect condition. The veal was fed to a cat, who had no complaints whatsoever."

http://www.internet-grocer.net/how-long.htm


"The Food Reference website states: Canned food retains its safety and nutritional value well beyond two years, but it may have some variation in quality, such as a change of color and texture. Canning is a high-heat process that renders the food commercially sterile. Food safety is not an issue in products kept on the shelf or in the pantry for long periods of time. In fact, canned food has an almost indefinite shelf life at moderate temperatures (75° F and below). Canned food as old as 100 years has been found in sunken ships and it is still microbiologically safe!"

http://blog.rv.net/2010/09/how-long-can-...ned-foods/

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"In canned foods, preservatives are used to maintain quality. The canning process keeps it safe. If a product is correctly processed, it should remain safe until opened or the seal is broken.
The U.S. Army has found that canned meats, vegetables and jam were in “excellent states of preservation” after 46 years."

http://blog.rv.net/2010/09/how-long-can-...ned-foods/

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As long as you store it properly, canned food will outlast you even if you live to be 100.

When i was in basic we routinely ate 30+ year old C-rations, they tasted perfectly fine...as far as C rats go.

So buy it, stick it in a cool dry place, and forget about it. You'll never need to buy more. (Of course you should inspect it annually to make sure that there is no damage to the cans from rust or whatever else)
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#8
Camper;42306 Wrote:In a SHTF scenario where you need to rely on decades old canned goods, you do NOT want to risk food poisoning or botulism.

As long as the can is not breached, the contents will remain STERILE indefinitely.
That said, I do rotate my canned stock (mainly because my wife refuses to) to avoid any complications with potentially damaged cans.
A dropped can should be consumed first because the damage may have induced a weak point that is more susceptible to corrosion from the inside.
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#9
I just inspect annually for dented cans. If I find any, I take them out of my stocks and give them to a random homeless person.
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#10
I try to rotate my stock, I believe in "store what you eat, eat what you store" but I mostly eat all fresh foods so I do not eat enough canned goods to keep them rotated.
Stonewall, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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