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Compressed wood logs?
#1
I just heard about these compressed wood logs that are available locally to me. Apparently they are made out compressed sawdust of mostly hardwoods, and contain no other ingredients such as wax or adhesive. They are supposed to burn hotter, slower, and cleaner than natural seasoned wood.

I called the supplier (Estates Chimney sweep in Chalfont, 215-997-6880) and they sell it in skids. One skid weighs 2 tons and contains many plastic-wrapped "packs" of logs that can be stored outside until use. The guy told me that a skid is about the equivalent of 1.25 to 1.5 cords of wood, and is $298. He said that they are so dense that they burn for much longer than wood, meaning you can go longer without stoking the fire. They are ready to burn and don't require any seasoning.

I'm split on the idea. I really like burning natural wood, but this seems like it could be very convenient. Also, I only have about 2 cords of wood now, and I need to come up with more fuel to make it through the winter. I'm thinking I might buy one skid and just see if I like it.

What do you guys think?
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#2
Did he mention the special grate you might need to burn them? Keeps them from falling apart. They burn beautifully leaving very little ash. Same as wood pellets. Find some place where you can buy a only a couple of sample logs. I think you'll like them.

More info here:

http://www.ehow.com/facts_7241721_compre...logs_.html
I swear, by my life and my love of it, that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine. - Ayn Rand
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#3
We were intrigued by the ad and the claims a couple years ago, but not enough to order and pay for a skid or a ton, or whatever. So we purchased 2 or 3 packs of, I think, 8 or so.

I wish I could remember the brand so you would have something better to go by. We burned them on several occasions, but we were never satisfied that they got as hot as claimed, and not nearly as hot as hardwood. It seemed they would burn kind of slow and lazy, with an average amount of flame, and almost zero coals, so they never established any kind of base. As you might expect, they burn just like a sawdust/wax, only without the wax.

If you want a decorative fire that has certain conveniences, go for it. If you are seriously thinking of heating all or part of your home, try it before you invest too much money in large quantities of the product. We immediately went back to seasoned hardwood. I still have of the bricks left and they will go into the bonfire next month, along with the rest of the yard waste.

I might take a supply of them, if they were free. Maybe. Good luck.

Edit to add: FWIW, we burned them in a Vermont Castings free-standing wood stove, in a 18' x 25' room.

Curnotafanmudgeon
.
“Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves.”

William Pitt
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#4
I've seen these available at tractor supply stores. I am also skeptical on how they perform without some type of forced air combustion system. These are basically giant pellets, I heat with a pellet stove. Pellets burn very gently and not all that hot with a natural draft. When forced air is applied, that is when they shine. I would expect the same with these brick products.
blaster668, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#5
(09-19-2012, 01:24 PM)Karl/PA Wrote: Did he mention the special grate you might need to burn them? Keeps them from falling apart. They burn beautifully leaving very little ash. Same as wood pellets. Find some place where you can buy a only a couple of sample logs. I think you'll like them.

More info here:

http://www.ehow.com/facts_7241721_compre...logs_.html

He didn't say anything about it. I assumed you could burn them just like wood logs.

(09-19-2012, 01:29 PM)Curmudgeon Wrote: We were intrigued by the ad and the claims a couple years ago, but not enough to order and pay for a skid or a ton, or whatever. So we purchased 2 or 3 packs of, I think, 8 or so.

I wish I could remember the brand so you would have something better to go by. We burned them on several occasions, but we were never satisfied that they got as hot as claimed, and not nearly as hot as hardwood. It seemed they would burn kind of slow and lazy, with an average amount of flame, and almost zero coals, so they never established any kind of base. As you might expect, they burn just like a sawdust/wax, only without the wax.

If you want a decorative fire that has certain conveniences, go for it. If you are seriously thinking of heating all or part of your home, try it before you invest too much money in large quantities of the product. We immediately went back to seasoned hardwood. I still have of the bricks left and they will go into the bonfire next month, along with the rest of the yard waste.

I might take a supply of them, if they were free. Maybe. Good luck.

Edit to add: FWIW, we burned them in a Vermont Castings free-standing wood stove, in a 18' x 25' room.

Curnotafanmudgeon
.

Thanks, I probably wont buy a whole skid then. Maybe I'll just grab a pack or two and see how they work. The guy seemed really confident about them, but then again he's a salesman.

(09-19-2012, 02:13 PM)blaster668 Wrote: I've seen these available at tractor supply stores. I am also skeptical on how they perform without some type of forced air combustion system. These are basically giant pellets, I heat with a pellet stove. Pellets burn very gently and not all that hot with a natural draft. When forced air is applied, that is when they shine. I would expect the same with these brick products.

Hmm, this isn't helping my confidence.

I wonder if these would work out well to supplement burning natural wood?
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#6
I would definately go to TSC and and buy a few first.
They may be useful to keep on hand.
Welcome to ObamaNation part deuxUtg
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#7
bac0nfat;8262 Wrote:I just heard about these compressed wood logs that are available locally to me. Apparently they are made out compressed sawdust of mostly hardwoods, and contain no other ingredients such as wax or adhesive. They are supposed to burn hotter, slower, and cleaner than natural seasoned wood.

I called the supplier (Estates Chimney sweep in Chalfont, 215-997-6880) and they sell it in skids. One skid weighs 2 tons and contains many plastic-wrapped "packs" of logs that can be stored outside until use. The guy told me that a skid is about the equivalent of 1.25 to 1.5 cords of wood, and is $298. He said that they are so dense that they burn for much longer than wood, meaning you can go longer without stoking the fire. They are ready to burn and don't require any seasoning.

I'm split on the idea. I really like burning natural wood, but this seems like it could be very convenient. Also, I only have about 2 cords of wood now, and I need to come up with more fuel to make it through the winter. I'm thinking I might buy one skid and just see if I like it.

What do you guys think?
They're ok, i've used them. They're not any better than regular logs IMO though.
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#8
Updating this thread with some info. I ended up buying a few packs to try, and LOVE them. So I bought a pallet to split with my neighbor, we went through that. I bought another 1/2 pallet for myself. Then just bought another full pallet. The stuff is called Wood Brick Fuel, and here is their website:

http://www.usrecycledwoodproducts.com/

The stuff is stupid easy to light, takes up way less space than firewood and you can store it right in your living room without worrying about bugs. It burns hot and long, and leaves practically zero ashes. My only gripe is, they just changed the packaging, and increased the price by about $40/pallet, plus now the pallets have 1,872 pounds of product instead of 2,000. So I'm spending more money to get less product. Which makes the whole idea less appealing.

So I think I'm going to keep using the stuff to get fires started, but then mix in traditional firewood to keep them burning. It's just too expensive to use it all the time.
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#9
bac0nfat;132296 Wrote:Updating this thread with some info. I ended up buying a few packs to try, and LOVE them. So I bought a pallet to split with my neighbor, we went through that. I bought another 1/2 pallet for myself. Then just bought another full pallet. The stuff is called Wood Brick Fuel, and here is their website:

http://www.usrecycledwoodproducts.com/

The stuff is stupid easy to light, takes up way less space than firewood and you can store it right in your living room without worrying about bugs. It burns hot and long, and leaves practically zero ashes. My only gripe is, they just changed the packaging, and increased the price by about $40/pallet, plus now the pallets have 1,872 pounds of product instead of 2,000. So I'm spending more money to get less product. Which makes the whole idea less appealing.

So I think I'm going to keep using the stuff to get fires started, but then mix in traditional firewood to keep them burning. It's just too expensive to use it all the time.

So what do you estimate your seasonal cost would be if you used them exclusively versus the amount of cord wood burned?
Welcome to ObamaNation part deuxUtg
  Reply
#10
God's Country;132309 Wrote:
bac0nfat;132296 Wrote:Updating this thread with some info. I ended up buying a few packs to try, and LOVE them. So I bought a pallet to split with my neighbor, we went through that. I bought another 1/2 pallet for myself. Then just bought another full pallet. The stuff is called Wood Brick Fuel, and here is their website:

http://www.usrecycledwoodproducts.com/

The stuff is stupid easy to light, takes up way less space than firewood and you can store it right in your living room without worrying about bugs. It burns hot and long, and leaves practically zero ashes. My only gripe is, they just changed the packaging, and increased the price by about $40/pallet, plus now the pallets have 1,872 pounds of product instead of 2,000. So I'm spending more money to get less product. Which makes the whole idea less appealing.

So I think I'm going to keep using the stuff to get fires started, but then mix in traditional firewood to keep them burning. It's just too expensive to use it all the time.

So what do you estimate your seasonal cost would be if you used them exclusively versus the amount of cord wood burned?

It's really hard to say, because I've only had a wood stove for 3 years now, and I admittedly haven't been burning the most seasoned wood the whole time. Also I've gotten wood from so many different sources including from my own property, and buying unsplit wood from a friend in the tree business at a discount, etc., so I don't have a good handle on the market value of wood, and I couldn't even tell you how long a cord of wood will last me since I acquire it in random quantities.

But I can give you some data points on the wood brick fuel. 40 pounds of wood bricks will last me about 8 hours of burning, and I only burn for typically 8 hours a day (monday-friday) which means a pallet (1 ton) will last me about 50 days. But since I burn more on the weekends, it really only lasts me 30 days. A pallet used to cost $300 but they just raised it to $330.

I'm sure it's probably more expensive than traditional firewood, but the convenience benefits are huge.
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