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Drone Base coming to Horsham
#1
http://www.myfoxphilly.com/story/2167606...to-horsham

Quote:Drone Command Center, 200-Plus Jobs Coming To Horsham
Mar 19, 2013 6:20 a.m.


New jobs and new technology are coming to the former Willow Grove Naval Air Station in Horsham.

Pentagon sources confirmed Monday for FOX 29 that the United States Air Force and the Pennsylvania National Guard will announce the formation of a command center for military drones on Tuesday morning.

The base will conduct missions to fly Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPAs) or drones from thousands of miles away.

No aircraft will actually fly out of the base. Pilots sit in virtual cockpits on the ground while flying missions ranging from bombing to reconnaissance. The center will be in charge of piloting MQ1 and MQ9 "Reaper" drones.

The Pennsylvania Air National Guard's 111th Fighter Wing has been the host military entity at the Horsham Air Guard Station since the Naval base officially closed in 2011.

The new command center will reportedly bring more than 200 new military and civilian jobs to the base.

"They are controlling drones around the world," said Horsham Township Manager William Walker.

Township officials had not heard about the official announcement about the new command center but knew it could be a possibility months ago. Walker said breathing new life into what's left of the base may help it's long-term sustainability, not to mention local businesses.

~snip~
"In 4 more OMao years you won't like how America looks....I guarantee it."
“When injustice becomes law, resistance becomes duty.” -- Thomas Jefferson
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#2
Hmmm... I wonder... since the drones being piloted remotely from thousands of miles away, if they start being deployed domestically, then neutralizing them in the hypothetical situation of some type of revolution would be pretty difficult.
tolerance for failure meter... LOW
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#3
Ten*K;89249 Wrote:Hmmm... I wonder... since the drones being piloted remotely from thousands of miles away, if they start being deployed domestically, then neutralizing them in the hypothetical situation of some type of revolution would be pretty difficult.

Unless they are going to tether the drone to the controlling computer with a very long cable, the possibility always exists to interrupt the signal and/or take control.
Vampire pig man since September 2012
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#4
Interesting.
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#5
Quote:Horsham Air Guard Station 'excited' about operating drones
In 2005, the Air Force announced that it would begin phasing out the A-10 Thunderbolt planes that operated out of the Horsham Air Guard Station. Not long afterward, officials at the base began a years-long search for a mission to fill the void.

The fruit of that search - a ground command center for military drones, announced this week - received a full airing Friday in a news conference at the base by a cadre of military personnel and elected officials.

"We're very excited about this mission," said Col. Howard Eissler, commander for the 111th Fighter Wing, which will establish the project, adding that it would be an "enduring mission" that will generate about 250 jobs, 75 of them expected to be full-time.

The drones are not expected to be piloted out of the Horsham Air Guard Station as the A-10 planes were. Instead, Eissler said, pilots and sensory operators will command the remotely controlled aircraft from Horsham as the drones fly overseas.

Establishing the command center is expected to cost between $7 million and $10 million, Eissler said, and while it will be considered an active mission on Oct. 1, he said it would take about two years for the command center to be fully operational; pilots need to be trained and facilities need to be modified, he said.

The staffing additions will be a significant boost to the base, which currently has about 750 Air Guard employees, 175 of whom are considered full-time.

And elected officials at Friday's news conference were quick to note their support of the project because of the jobs it would add.

"This is a very, very big day for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania," said U.S. Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick (R., Bucks), whose district borders the base.

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Great! Just what my area needs. I don't trust the part about the drones only flying overseas. After Fast and Furious, the ammo purchases, the armored personnel carriers being ordered, and now this, I am even closer to putting on a tin foil hat.
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#6
Of course they're excited, that base has been on the verge of shut down for years now. Without a mission, these guys would have to look for jobs at the rest of the state units if they wanted to get their retirement. Not only that, from a military standpoint its a great mission, with lots of money and high ops tempo coming their way, which means more orders, more active duty training, and more full-time positions with higher grades.
Vampire pig man since September 2012
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#7
It is not that hard to jam a drone from receiving/sending its multiple signals if you know what frequencies it uses, and all of that information is out there on the internet. Even instructions on how to build RF jammers. I'm unaware as to whether or not anyone has actually brought down a drone by cutting off its communication. Hopefully someone more knowledgeable will comment on that.
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#8
topsykretts;90740 Wrote:It is not that hard to jam a drone from receiving/sending its multiple signals if you know what frequencies it uses, and all of that information is out there on the internet. Even instructions on how to build RF jammers. I'm unaware as to whether or not anyone has actually brought down a drone by cutting off its communication. Hopefully someone more knowledgeable will comment on that.

The drones are supposed to be smart enough that if they lose contact with their controller they're to return to base.
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#9
topsykretts;90740 Wrote:It is not that hard to jam a drone from receiving/sending its multiple signals if you know what frequencies it uses, and all of that information is out there on the internet. Even instructions on how to build RF jammers. I'm unaware as to whether or not anyone has actually brought down a drone by cutting off its communication. Hopefully someone more knowledgeable will comment on that.

It is indeed rather simple to build a RF jamming device.

It is also rather simple to use the signal from the RF jamming device itself as a homing beacon.

Just saying.


Jan
[Image: oh_no_not_again2.jpg]
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#10
MostlyHarmless;90748 Wrote:
topsykretts;90740 Wrote:It is not that hard to jam a drone from receiving/sending its multiple signals if you know what frequencies it uses, and all of that information is out there on the internet. Even instructions on how to build RF jammers. I'm unaware as to whether or not anyone has actually brought down a drone by cutting off its communication. Hopefully someone more knowledgeable will comment on that.

It is indeed rather simple to build a RF jamming device.

It is also rather simple to use the signal from the RF jamming device itself as a homing beacon.

Just saying.


Jan

It's not called the "Highspeed Anti Radiation Missile" for nuttin' ya know.

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