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Entry Level Press package
#1
I am interested in getting started with doing some reloading. I was just wondering if this would be a good kit to get started out with.
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/121744/...-press-kit
Now I am mostly just interested in A. reloading for my pistol in
.40, B. Either saving some money or getting to shoot more often, C. Just learning a valuable skill.

Eventually assuming I would stick with it, I would step up to a Dillon 650 or comparable progressive press.
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#2
Don't know much about Lee presses but I do know that a RCBS single stage press is built like a tank and will last a life time. I had a single stage RCBS rock-chucker and they are very solid.
arjohnson, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#3
Thanks ARjohnson, Ill check RCBS out.
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#4
I would start off with a Lee Classic turret press, it will make the process go much much faster! I have been reloading with one for a few years now, and i'm just starting to think about upgrading to a progressive press. This is the kit that I started with: http://www.cabelas.com/product/Lee-Preci...l+Products

You will need to pick up a set of dies for .40.

Also, pick up a caliper and a decent digital scale. I got a 30 dollar scale from Frankford armory and so far it seems to work pretty well for what I use it for.
"That’s no reason to cry. One cries because one is sad. For example, I cry because others are stupid, and that makes me sad."
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#5
That is the exact same setup that I am using. You will of course need a few other things depending on what all you get.

Personally, I live it. I set my dies, then pull the bushing. In just moments I can change dies, or calibers.

The press is easy to use, and set up. The powder measure, I'm sure there are better, but it is very good (I load for .45 so a difference of .02 doesn't concern me).

The balance beam scale takes a little bit to get used to. Just how you read the finer measurements.

I would estimate I have loaded around 3k rounds. Not a single problem.

A few things I would suggest. Get bushings for every die. Set it, and forget it.

Also, the spent primer tube, it fills up faster than you might think. I have seen people place pop bottles an the like on the end. I just slide a bucket underneath and take the rubber boot off.

For right around $100 you get everything you need. It is well priced, well made, and will get you on the road to reloading.
This will be the best security for maintaining our liberties. A nation of well-informed men who have been taught to know and prize the rights which God has given them cannot be enslaved. It is in the religion of ignorance that tyranny begins. -Ben Franklin
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#6
The Hobbit;51837 Wrote:I am interested in getting started with doing some reloading. I was just wondering if this would be a good kit to get started out with.
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/121744/...-press-kit
Now I am mostly just interested in A. reloading for my pistol in
.40, B. Either saving some money or getting to shoot more often, C. Just learning a valuable skill.

Before you even think about equipment buy two reloading manuals and read the how to and information sections first so you have a basic understanding of the process and the materials. Then analyze how much shooting you actually do. 50 to 100 rounds per month? Reloading probably won't pay for you. 200 rounds per week, after you get past 10,000 rounds or so you'll have "saved" enough money to pay for the equipment and your per round cost might be down to about 9 cents. But! Don't expect to save money by reloading! What money you "save" ion ammo costs you'll burn-up because you'll be shooting more. Don't decide on equipment until you've completed your analysis.
Brick, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#7
i have lee presses. they do what needs done.
i also started out with pretty much the same kit. a single stage is great to learn on, as you can only do one step at a time. however once you get a handle on it, you will become frustrated at how slow it is.
i moved up to a lee three hole turret and love it. i use the single stage for decapping/sizing and the turret for everything else. have all my dies in turrets, so just swap out calibers with the flip of the wrist.
the fabrication doesn't stop in the shop, that's what the field guys are for.
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#8
Brick;54360 Wrote:Before you even think about equipment buy two reloading manuals and read the how to and information sections first so you have a basic understanding of the process and the materials. Then analyze how much shooting you actually do. 50 to 100 rounds per month? Reloading probably won't pay for you. 200 rounds per week, after you get past 10,000 rounds or so you'll have "saved" enough money to pay for the equipment and your per round cost might be down to about 9 cents. But! Don't expect to save money by reloading! What money you "save" ion ammo costs you'll burn-up because you'll be shooting more. Don't decide on equipment until you've completed your analysis.
I realize that right now I probably do not shoot enough to save any money off a purchase this. Part of the reason I do want to get into it is so hopefully instead of "saving" is that I can get out and shoot more regularly. I also just want to learn this skill and maybe eventually save a more significant amount of money.

brian;54430 Wrote:i have lee presses. they do what needs done.
i also started out with pretty much the same kit. a single stage is great to learn on, as you can only do one step at a time. however once you get a handle on it, you will become frustrated at how slow it is.
i moved up to a lee three hole turret and love it. i use the single stage for decapping/sizing and the turret for everything else. have all my dies in turrets, so just swap out calibers with the flip of the wrist.
This was about my thoughts on this. Eventually I would probably just jump from the single stage press to a nice progressive(in a couple years). For now though I figured this would help me learn the skills needed and force me to slow down and watch what I am doing.
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#9
In my opinion a single stage is the way to start. You can move up to turret or progressive if your interest and need warrants it. If the interest and perceived need is there but the budget isn't, the single stage will still get you to the range. Lee is a great value, the press will last a long time, (I've been using mine for more than 20 years), and that kit you have picked out will get you everything you need except the dies and components for less than the cost of a "name brand" press by itself. Don't get me wrong, RCBS, Lyman Hornady and the others are great and I have no complaints against any of them, I even have a Rockchucker RCBS press but I still use my original Lee more often. The shell holders are interchangeable but different manufacturers number them differently. (They all fit the Lee, RCBS, Hornady, etc, but the shell holder for .308 would be #2 in Lee or Lyman, #3 in RCBS and #1 in Hornady). The dies are interchangeable too, they're all 7/8-14 thread unless you get into the high end progressives or the OLD Lyman presses.
I'll say that I think you've made a good choice for an entry level setup and it may well be the only setup you'll ever need unless you shoot a high volume and need speed. Even with that being said, the single stage gets you more hands on with the brass so you'll have more opportunities to see what possible flaws to be looking for and be able to spot them quicker and easier if/when you move up to a more high volume setup, and that's a very valuable thing to learn.

And make sure you get a manual or two and read them before you start. Even better would be finding a veteran reloader who could get you started, (after you read the manuals).

ETA:
here is a link to the common manufacturers of shell holders and which ones fit which cases. They all fit presses made in the past 50+ years to current production unless you go with something expensive and proprietary:
http://handloads.com/misc/shellholders.asp
There are three types of people in the world:
Those who make things happen,
Those who watch things happen,
And those who wonder what happened.
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#10
Well you see that's why I suggested you read a couple manuals first. So you can analyze and decide for yourself.

You say:
Quote:This was about my thoughts on this. Eventually I would probably just jump from the single stage press to a nice progressive(in a couple years). For now though I figured this would help me learn the skills needed and force me to slow down and watch what I am doing.

If you're really serious, keep in mind, you can start with a progressive. Just go through the reloading process one step at a time as with a single stage. Which is much easier than turning a single stage into a progressive. But, there are those folks who like to use a single for their low volume reloading and to develop loads for "production". But, do what's best and most comfortable and cost effective for you.
Brick, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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