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Entry Level Press package
#11
Brick;55024 Wrote:Well you see that's why I suggested you read a couple manuals first. So you can analyze and decide for yourself.

You say:
Quote:This was about my thoughts on this. Eventually I would probably just jump from the single stage press to a nice progressive(in a couple years). For now though I figured this would help me learn the skills needed and force me to slow down and watch what I am doing.

If you're really serious, keep in mind, you can start with a progressive. Just go through the reloading process one step at a time as with a single stage. Which is much easier than turning a single stage into a progressive. But, there are those folks who like to use a single for their low volume reloading and to develop loads for "production". But, do what's best and most comfortable and cost effective for you.

Okay that makes more sense. I openly admit at this point it is going to be low volume so a progressive would be unneeded at this juncture. There is also the fact that there is no way I could afford to purchase a nice progressive at this point. I do plan on doing my homework before starting and have several friends that reload already that have been giving me pointers based on their experience.
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#12
The Hobbit;55071 Wrote:Okay that makes more sense. I openly admit at this point it is going to be low volume so a progressive would be unneeded at this juncture. There is also the fact that there is no way I could afford to purchase a nice progressive at this point. I do plan on doing my homework before starting and have several friends that reload already that have been giving me pointers based on their experience.

That's your best resource right there, unless they're the type to feel as though their way is best and everyone else can pound sand. When it comes to safety, being strict about it is good, when it comes to advice about "brand X is the only thing worth owning, everything else is junk" you want to take it with a grain of salt and get other opinions.
When you start reading your manuals you will undoubtedly have questions, ask your friends. A quick explanation in terms they know you'll understand is worth a LOT more than reading the same thing over and over trying to make sense of something you don't quite understand. Actually seeing the process and getting pointers is far more valuable than reading a book and thinking you're doing it right when there is a slight misunderstanding and you're actually not doing it quite right.
You can and will learn from reading books, trial and error and reading the books again, (or different books), but hands on with someone who has experience is THE way to go provided it's not someone with bad habits who will lead you astray. If you have a few friends you'll probably be able to tell the difference pretty quickly by working with each of them and pick up on which ones have the better habits. Maybe you'll be lucky and all of them will set good examples with good safety practices and good techniques.
More power to ya. Make informed decisions and keep moving ahead.
It's really not difficult but it can get involved when you start trying to get maximum accuracy by uniforming primer pockets, flash holes, neck wall thickness and concentricity and all that other good stuff. Loading ammo for plinking and general target shooting is incredibly easy, once you learn how. Just don't let yourself get complacent because it seems so easy, that's when you could get sloppy and make a terrible mistake, and mistakes when reloading can be real terrible.
There are three types of people in the world:
Those who make things happen,
Those who watch things happen,
And those who wonder what happened.
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#13
Actually, I just saw you are in Erie. If you would like, you are more than welcome to stop by my place. I only load for .45. But it is still the same procedure. I could even let you run a few rounds through my lee, and you can see if you would like it.

I will warn you, I am about an hour from Erie. So if you were in the area, or wouldn't mind a bit of a drive, I would be more than happy to show you the ropes myself.
This will be the best security for maintaining our liberties. A nation of well-informed men who have been taught to know and prize the rights which God has given them cannot be enslaved. It is in the religion of ignorance that tyranny begins. -Ben Franklin
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#14
mauser;55133 Wrote:
The Hobbit;55071 Wrote:Okay that makes more sense. I openly admit at this point it is going to be low volume so a progressive would be unneeded at this juncture. There is also the fact that there is no way I could afford to purchase a nice progressive at this point. I do plan on doing my homework before starting and have several friends that reload already that have been giving me pointers based on their experience.

That's your best resource right there, unless they're the type to feel as though their way is best and everyone else can pound sand. When it comes to safety, being strict about it is good, when it comes to advice about "brand X is the only thing worth owning, everything else is junk" you want to take it with a grain of salt and get other opinions.
When you start reading your manuals you will undoubtedly have questions, ask your friends. A quick explanation in terms they know you'll understand is worth a LOT more than reading the same thing over and over trying to make sense of something you don't quite understand. Actually seeing the process and getting pointers is far more valuable than reading a book and thinking you're doing it right when there is a slight misunderstanding and you're actually not doing it quite right.
You can and will learn from reading books, trial and error and reading the books again, (or different books), but hands on with someone who has experience is THE way to go provided it's not someone with bad habits who will lead you astray. If you have a few friends you'll probably be able to tell the difference pretty quickly by working with each of them and pick up on which ones have the better habits. Maybe you'll be lucky and all of them will set good examples with good safety practices and good techniques.
More power to ya. Make informed decisions and keep moving ahead.
It's really not difficult but it can get involved when you start trying to get maximum accuracy by uniforming primer pockets, flash holes, neck wall thickness and concentricity and all that other good stuff. Loading ammo for plinking and general target shooting is incredibly easy, once you learn how. Just don't let yourself get complacent because it seems so easy, that's when you could get sloppy and make a terrible mistake, and mistakes when reloading can be real terrible.
Yeah I have a few friends that have offered to help me out. Going as far as giving me advice on powders that will make a double charge fairly obvious and other hints. As well as telling me I am more then welcome to come over and get some hands on experience with it.

Connal;55139 Wrote:Actually, I just saw you are in Erie. If you would like, you are more than welcome to stop by my place. I only load for .45. But it is still the same procedure. I could even let you run a few rounds through my lee, and you can see if you would like it.

I will warn you, I am about an hour from Erie. So if you were in the area, or wouldn't mind a bit of a drive, I would be more than happy to show you the ropes myself.

I may take you up on that offer sometime. Are you south of erie along 79?
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#15
The Hobbit;55819 Wrote:
mauser;55133 Wrote:That's your best resource right there, unless they're the type to feel as though their way is best and everyone else can pound sand. When it comes to safety, being strict about it is good, when it comes to advice about "brand X is the only thing worth owning, everything else is junk" you want to take it with a grain of salt and get other opinions.
When you start reading your manuals you will undoubtedly have questions, ask your friends. A quick explanation in terms they know you'll understand is worth a LOT more than reading the same thing over and over trying to make sense of something you don't quite understand. Actually seeing the process and getting pointers is far more valuable than reading a book and thinking you're doing it right when there is a slight misunderstanding and you're actually not doing it quite right.
You can and will learn from reading books, trial and error and reading the books again, (or different books), but hands on with someone who has experience is THE way to go provided it's not someone with bad habits who will lead you astray. If you have a few friends you'll probably be able to tell the difference pretty quickly by working with each of them and pick up on which ones have the better habits. Maybe you'll be lucky and all of them will set good examples with good safety practices and good techniques.
More power to ya. Make informed decisions and keep moving ahead.
It's really not difficult but it can get involved when you start trying to get maximum accuracy by uniforming primer pockets, flash holes, neck wall thickness and concentricity and all that other good stuff. Loading ammo for plinking and general target shooting is incredibly easy, once you learn how. Just don't let yourself get complacent because it seems so easy, that's when you could get sloppy and make a terrible mistake, and mistakes when reloading can be real terrible.
Yeah I have a few friends that have offered to help me out. Going as far as giving me advice on powders that will make a double charge fairly obvious and other hints. As well as telling me I am more then welcome to come over and get some hands on experience with it.

Connal;55139 Wrote:Actually, I just saw you are in Erie. If you would like, you are more than welcome to stop by my place. I only load for .45. But it is still the same procedure. I could even let you run a few rounds through my lee, and you can see if you would like it.

I will warn you, I am about an hour from Erie. So if you were in the area, or wouldn't mind a bit of a drive, I would be more than happy to show you the ropes myself.

I may take you up on that offer sometime. Are you south of erie along 79?


Pretty close to 79. Mapquest oil city.
This will be the best security for maintaining our liberties. A nation of well-informed men who have been taught to know and prize the rights which God has given them cannot be enslaved. It is in the religion of ignorance that tyranny begins. -Ben Franklin
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#16
it is a good set up. should do you for years.
when it comes to cost. how many boxes of ammo can you by for $120 ? when that is shot up it is gone. spending that much on a press you get to shoot more. the most expensive part of a round is the brass case. so if you use them over you are saving money. now you want to save even more start casting you own bullets. i have been loading and casting for 40 years.
bob308, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#17
Sorry to be off-topic, but...

You sly bastards! I saw "Entry Level Press package" in "View Unread Posts" and thought it was a tool to help us reach the media with our gun-related activities! You got me!

Now I'm going to have to put together an Entry Level Press package and make a thread!
MDJschool, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Dec 2012.
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#18
Sage advise on getting a couple of reloading manuals first.
As far as Lee equipment goes, I've been using it for 30+ years and am extremely satisfied. I traded a Rockchucker for a Lee progressive about 25 years ago and was hooked. At that time I would use the turret press for low volume rifle reloading, the progressive for turning out large volumes of handgun ammo.
I currently use a 3 hole turret and a Pro 1000. Both are a great value and if you take care of them they can easily be a lifetime tool for the average reloader. Once your dies are installed and adjusted you don't need to fool around with them again. Changing calibers takes about 30 seconds on the turret press. A couple of minutes on the progressive.
Their case trimmers are fantastic. Nothing to slip out of adjustment. Every case trimmed to the the same length.
I even use the Lee dies for almost all of my reloading. I have a few Ackley calibers that Lee doesn't make dies for so I had to go elsewhere.
Didn't intend on this being an advert for Lee Precision but for my money they are the best value.
ColdBlueSteel, proud to be a potential enemy of the state.
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#19
Well a certain jolly fat man in a red suit must have seen this thread and picked me one up and a manual. Just need to get dies, powder and bullets. Oh and read through the manual a little more thoroughly. looking forward to getting started with this part of the hobby.
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#20
i would get carbide dies.
also get in the habit of picking up brass left lay by others. it is once fired and free. it will reload just as nice as that wich you take out of a box.
bob308, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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