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Fire & lots of it
#31
God's Country;24892 Wrote:Burning wood is no joke. It's a lot of hard work that never seems to end, but it can be addicting, and having a year or more of future heat stored and ready to go is a damn good feeling.

This is so true. It's not only comforting, but rewarding at the same time, knowing that you really earned the warmth that you can enjoy and rely on.
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#32
My son just bought a house with a coal stove in the basement and he said he'd like to burn wood in it too. Is there any reason why he couldn't or shouldn't do it?
He just put new glass and rope insulation on the top door and still has to put the rope on the bottom door so I figured while he's reconditioning it would be the time to make any modifications or improvements.
I haven't mentioned this to him yet because I'd like to get some info on it first, but is a heat exchanger for the chimney a good investment?
Or maybe I should ask which type/brand is a better investment.
Does anyone have a home made heat exchanger that works well and is reasonable to make that you'd be willing to share your idea or plans?
He has a few feet of straight pipe between the stove and where it exits the house to work with.
This picture is pretty crappy, it's cropped from a picture that was focused on something else but the image is good enough to get the idea of what he's working with.

[Image: Coal_Stove.jpg]
There are three types of people in the world:
Those who make things happen,
Those who watch things happen,
And those who wonder what happened.
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#33
I have heard that if you fell trees when the leaves are green, the leaves will continue to process the water left in the tree and dry it much quicker than if you fell them when there are no leaves.
Can anyone confirm that?
60-15, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Oct 2012.
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#34
mauser;25114 Wrote:My son just bought a house with a coal stove in the basement and he said he'd like to burn wood in it too. Is there any reason why he couldn't or shouldn't do it?
He just put new glass and rope insulation on the top door and still has to put the rope on the bottom door so I figured while he's reconditioning it would be the time to make any modifications or improvements.
I haven't mentioned this to him yet because I'd like to get some info on it first, but is a heat exchanger for the chimney a good investment?
Or maybe I should ask which type/brand is a better investment.
Does anyone have a home made heat exchanger that works well and is reasonable to make that you'd be willing to share your idea or plans?
He has a few feet of straight pipe between the stove and where it exits the house to work with.
This picture is pretty crappy, it's cropped from a picture that was focused on something else but the image is good enough to get the idea of what he's working with.

You mean like make a water jacket around the existing flue pipe? If that's the case it would be doable, but I wouldn't and to make a system that's too efficient, because I would think in theory you would be turning your flue into a graham condenser, which if the flue cooled too much might make the bad stuff that you want going up the chimney condense on the walls and cause build up, but I couldn't say for certain. Maybe another option would be to weld some fins to the outside of the flue pipe to passively dissipate the heat and increase the surface area and thereby increase thermal output. Another thing I've read about with wood stoves specifically is people sometimes buy un-coated granite counter-top slabs from a counter-top place and laying them on the top of the stove or attaching them to the sides to act as a thermal mass that retains heat. That way it will take the heat energy when the fire is at it's hottest and dissipate it even after the fire goes out since the steel the stove is made of doesn't hold the heat the same as the granite does.

60-15;25196 Wrote:I have heard that if you fell trees when the leaves are green, the leaves will continue to process the water left in the tree and dry it much quicker than if you fell them when there are no leaves.
Can anyone confirm that?

This seems logical, but I've never heard that before. I think it could be problematic though as keeping the branches on the logs would mean they wouldn't stack as nicely for long term storage, and if they just lay out on the ground they can attract termites and other bugs which could turn into a real nightmare.
The forum poster formerly known as Emoticon...
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