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In close vote, Utah House OKs firing-squad proposal
#1
Quote:In close vote, Utah House OKs firing-squad proposal
Published February 14, 2015
Associated Press


Jan. 27, 2015: Randy Gardner of Salt Lake City, the older brother of Ronnie Lee Gardner, the last inmate to be killed by firing squad in Utah in 2010, protests with a group opposed to capital punishment plans.

A hotly contested proposal that resurrects Utah's use of firing squads to carry out executions narrowly passed a key vote Friday in the state's Legislature after three missing lawmakers were summoned to break a tie vote.

The Republican-controlled House of Representatives voted 39-34 Friday morning to approve the measure, sending it to an uncertain fate in the state's GOP-controlled Senate. Leaders in that chamber have thus far declined to say if they'll support it, and Utah's Republican Gov. Gary Herbert won't say if he'll sign it.
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2015/02/...latestnews
das, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#2
Barring the initial psychological fear I think this method would bring....the actual death seems like it would be probably the quickest and most humane way. There have been quite a few reports of the lethal injection going wrong.

I thing firing squad just has sort of a "harder on the viewer than on the victim" thing going on.

Plus the sort of people who would deserve this.....I'm not sure why there's such a hangup. Vicious murderers and rapists.....ugh.
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#3
Well, as a SWAT sniper once put it during a cable documentary, "Some people just need to be shot."
I don't suffer from insanity.
I enjoy every minute of it.
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#4
I grew up in Utah. In high school I took an Occupational Law Enforcement class that was taught by the school resource officer, who happened to also be a full time Salt Lake County Sheriff with the rank of detective. The execution by firing squad was something we discussed for a whole day. What I remember is that all but 1 officer of all those selected for the execution duty have live rounds. The other gets a blank round. None of them know who has the blank. All are aiming for the same spot, which I believe is the heart. I believe this is the same exact way of doing things Utah is bringing back.
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#5
An interesting perspective from an opponent of the death penalty:

Quote:In praise of the firing squad



Before I explain why, I’ll first disclose that I’m opposed to the death penalty, and I have no doubt that my opposition to state-sanctioned killing influences my opinions on which method of execution we ought to use. So read the rest of this post with that in mind.

If you support the death penalty, the most obvious benefit of the firing squad is that unlike lethal injection drugs, correctional institutions are never going to run out of bullets. And if they do, more bullets won’t be very difficult to find. Ammunition companies aren’t susceptible to pressure from anti-death penalty activists, at least not to the degree a pharmaceutical company might be. This would actually remove a barrier to more efficient executions. As someone who would like to see executions eliminated entirely, I don’t personally see this as a benefit. But death penalty supporters might. And there are other benefits to the firing squad, benefits that I think people on both sides of the issue can appreciate.

First, let’s talk about humaneness. When we talk about the humanity of a particular form of execution, we like to think we’re trying to find the most civilized way to put someone to death. We recoil at methods such as the guillotine, hanging and the firing squad as barbaric anachronisms of a different era, when crowds gathered to witness and revel in the event. The lethal injection, most of us think, simply puts the condemned to sleep. There’s no pain, no violence, no spectacle. It’s how civilized countries carry out executions.

The problem is that we really don’t know what happens when the lethal injection drugs go to work.



This sets up a final argument in favor of the firing squad: There is no mistaking what it is. There are no IVs, needles, cotton swabs or other accoutrements more commonly associated with healing. When we hear about an execution on the news, we won’t hear about an inmate slowly drifting off to sleep. We’ll hear about guns and bullets. Killing is an act of violence. That’s what witnesses will see, and that’s what the reports will tell us has happened. If we’re going to permit the government to kill on our behalf, we should own what we’re doing.

This is where a critic might argue that as a death penalty opponent, I’m merely arguing for the method of execution that I think is most likely to turn people off to the death penalty. I’ll be honest: I hope that’s what will happen. I hope that when confronted with a method of execution that’s less opaque about what’s actually transpiring, more of us will come to realize that we no longer need capital punishment. But I’m not particularly optimistic that will happen. I suspect that there’s a strong segment of the public (and probably a majority) that will support the death penalty no matter how we carry out executions.

Regardless of its impact on the death penalty debate, if we must continue to execute people, the firing squad has a lot to offer. It isn’t just the most humane form of execution now realistically under consideration, it is the most humane from the correct perspective — the experience of the condemned. It brings no concerns about the supply of execution materials. It raises no issues about medical ethics — it doesn’t blur the lines between healing and hurting. It’s honest. It’s transparent. And it is appropriately violent.
I am not a lawyer.
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#6
I'd like to hear that authors opinion on where to shoot. Should executioners aim for the heart, brain stem, or somewhere else. Now, let's see what their opinion on the matter is. Dive deeper into the subject and you often get the truth once the horrible thoughts of reality settle in to the thought process.

To be fair, I support the firing squad execution so much that I would accept the responsibility if asked, and all the displeasures associated with it. If it's my nightmare it won't be somebody elses. I do not take pleasure in taking another person's life, but I've also learned to handle it due to the time spent as a Marine Rifleman.
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#7
I didn't know that about the blank. That's interesting.....I guess to diminish the feeling of guilt the shooters would have.

I have family in Utah....beautiful state!
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#8
Watching some movies ( actual live executions ) where the firing squad was used, there is a paper target placed on the outer garment of the condemned and that is the point of aim. Knowing that you might be the one taking a life from a prisoner MAY cause them to waver on the shot, even knowing that they may have a blank cartridge in their weapon. That is why the heart area is used as it is a bigger target area than the head. And, yes, the blank cartridge is used so that the firing squad member has doubt if their's was the actual killing shot. More of a psychological benefit for that person...
I also think the heart area is used as the family members would have more traumatic result of the person is shot in the chest ( heart ) than in the head...

I DO believe in the death penalty, and with all the controversy concerning the drugs used I think this is a viable solution than the drugs.

I also remember seeing one time a long time ago where there were 7 rifles set up to impact on a certain point and it was tripped by a mechanical clock to eliminate human error and also eliminates for a full firing squad. THAT would be the most logical solution to this situation, and most accurate to provide a swift and final execution of the condemned individual.
You want to take my guns away ???? SCREW YOU ............
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#9
If it has to be done, the only "humane" way to do it is with nitrogen or something similar.
[Image: picsay-1358258813.jpg]
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#10
An accurate shot has always been considered "humane" for suffering humans (wartime, old days) and animals.

I don't see why violent criminals are above that.
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