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Is Libertarian Right For Me
#1
So let me explain what's going on here. I have been a registered "R" since I was 18. I have, more or less, voted party lines. Lately I've been re-thinking my affiliations.

I went through my belief system and really not sure where I fit in anymore. On certain issues I fall squarely with the Republicans and on others with the Democrats. Every time I take one of those convoluted quizzes I find myself just to the right of the middle.

So I have really been researching the ideals and issues of the LP and I think I'm a Libertarian, but I'm not sure.

I'm not looking to spark a massive political debate and raise the ire concerning voting 3rd party, at 37 years old I'm just trying to find my rightful place in the political spectrum. Can anyone help me out?
NRA (Life), GOA, FOAC (Life), NAGR, AMGOA

RocketFoot's Minion since 09-07-2012
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#2
Although I find it hard to believe that anybody can be tuned into the Democrats for anything, especially as a gun owner, you're either an independent or a RINO.
JMHO
"In 4 more OMao years you won't like how America looks....I guarantee it."
“When injustice becomes law, resistance becomes duty.” -- Thomas Jefferson
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#3
bigdawgbeav;114547 Wrote:I'm just trying to find my rightful place in the political spectrum. Can anyone help me out?

Figure out what top 1-3 issues (in order of importance) are most important to you, or on what topics you are unwilling to bend on.

Find the parties that are closest to that.

Then, look at the other issues that are important to you and put them in the "would like to have" category, and then see what party from your first pass matches best.

You have now found what party you are a best fit with.

But you're not done.

Now, look at what party is diametrically opposed to the topic(s) you are not willing to bend on. This is your "political enemy," for lack of a better term. Ask yourself "Does my party have a legitimate chance at beating that party during an election?"

If it does, then you are golden.

If it doesn't, then you have to consider voting for the party that does stand a chance or vote for your party anyway, knowing that it will not win and your "political enemy" may be the one that wins.

If you are willing to take the chance or accept the consequence, or do not like the positions of the alternative to your "political enemy" then vote your conscience.

That's essentially how you play the game.

I like a lot of libertarian views, and find myself shifting there as Republicans become more and more progressive, but there are still issues on which the libertarian party and I do not agree.

And since I'm still essentially a single issue voter (guns being the issue) then I will vote for whichever party is most likely to beat the party that pushes gun bans every chance they can.
Vampire pig man since September 2012
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#4
Pocketprotector;114548 Wrote:Although I find it hard to believe that anybody can be tuned into the Democrats for anything, especially as a gun owner, you're either an independent or a RINO.
JMHO

I'm referring to certain social issues...
NRA (Life), GOA, FOAC (Life), NAGR, AMGOA

RocketFoot's Minion since 09-07-2012
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#5
Personally held beliefs are a wonderful thing, our true failure as a society is that we are often impatient when it comes to their implementation. I have been a registered L since I was 18. I didn't use any formula, I just did some good ol' fashion reading and research. I came to the conclusion that I can register myself as any party affiliation and still vote for whomever I feel will best represent my ideals. In PA the biggest factor for registering for the main two are that you have a say in the primaries. Perhaps that is true, but I have felt since 2000 that the primaries are all but over by the time this state weighs in.

There will be many who will tell you that the 3rd party candidates are a waste of time and that every vote for them is a vote for the enemy. Its all hog wash and nonsense. Getting just one third party candidate into your local government can change a great deal, getting them into the US congress is even better. I don't think my generation will see a 3rd party president, but I see a change in conventional thinking at the lower levels. That is honestly where change starts and where it has its biggest impact.

My advice is to do some more soul searching. Check out the local Libertarian campaign and see who you can help get elected. Maybe its your thing maybe you stay right where you are at. Doesn't hurt anything to try.
JDP, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Apr 2013.
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#6
I was about the same age when I began to realize the R's were more full of shit then even I was giving them credit for. While I don't consider myself a libertarian, over the past few years it's been harder and harder to support anything mainstream. I generally refer to myself as a reluctant libertarian. I don't agree with the seemingly hardcore libertarian because reality is hard to ignore 24/7 , but the two party system makes it hard to do much else these days. No one wants to fix anything because no one wants to give up anything...except freedom...sadly.
Welcome to ObamaNation part deuxUtg
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#7
Which party says run em all out of the house, burn the house down and start over with nothing but the Bill of Rights? That's my party.
The law? The law is a human institution...
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#8
I am against any party affiliation (at least for now) simply because I see what's happened with the Democratic and Republican parties. They do become like religions to some people. Many people are truly in the middle, but the parties are incredibly polarized as far as the stances they say they take on issues. They both do a lot of lip service, but their actions usually aren't much different. How many of you have felt betrayed by people like John McCain?

I identify more with the Libertarian party, but am hesitant to identify myself as one, because I worry about simple party affiliation and "voting the party line" to later find it was all a bunch of B.S. However, I will say that I am disgusted with the status quo to the point that if given the option I will choose to vote Libertarian or Independent as opposed to R or D, especially against an incumbent most times.

There is often more information out there than I have the ability to absorb, but on any important election (reps, President, Gov, etc...) I try to do my research on the candidates to find the one who's values are geared the most towards freedom and liberty above all else and vote for them when I have the option. Usually I do find the Libertarian candidate (at least from what they say) is the best choice as far as that goes. And if I'm really disgusted with the R and D candidate choices, I can guarantee I'll vote for someone else.

Many think that voting for someone who doesn't have a chance to win is throwing your vote away, but I disagree. As long as people continue to think that way we are just going to keep getting the same crap over and over again, until our freedoms and liberties are eventually completely eroded and our nation is run completely into the mud. We need to do something to change where we are headed and the Libertarian party, even if not the perfect choice, is definitely a good strong yank on the steering wheel if we can get enough of them in elected office to make a difference. If the Libertarian party is successful in implementing the values they say they hold true, I think it will be good for the country. Maybe I am a Libertarian and I just haven't fully realized it yet.

Anyway, that's my two cents on the subject. Wink
LostCyborg, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Jun 2013.

You wouldn't be able to run as many people over with that car if it didn't drive as far. It should only have a 10 gallon fuel tank.
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#9
Sorry to see you're not voting Republican because with toomey, romney, mccain and fat ass in NJ it sure seems like they push for gun laws every chance they can. Smile (j/k)


Camper;114553 Wrote:
bigdawgbeav;114547 Wrote:I'm just trying to find my rightful place in the political spectrum. Can anyone help me out?

Figure out what top 1-3 issues (in order of importance) are most important to you, or on what topics you are unwilling to bend on.

Find the parties that are closest to that.

Then, look at the other issues that are important to you and put them in the "would like to have" category, and then see what party from your first pass matches best.

You have now found what party you are a best fit with.

But you're not done.

Now, look at what party is diametrically opposed to the topic(s) you are not willing to bend on. This is your "political enemy," for lack of a better term. Ask yourself "Does my party have a legitimate chance at beating that party during an election?"

If it does, then you are golden.

If it doesn't, then you have to consider voting for the party that does stand a chance or vote for your party anyway, knowing that it will not win and your "political enemy" may be the one that wins.

If you are willing to take the chance or accept the consequence, or do not like the positions of the alternative to your "political enemy" then vote your conscience.

That's essentially how you play the game.

I like a lot of libertarian views, and find myself shifting there as Republicans become more and more progressive, but there are still issues on which the libertarian party and I do not agree.

And since I'm still essentially a single issue voter (guns being the issue) then I will vote for whichever party is most likely to beat the party that pushes gun bans every chance they can.
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#10
I've only been out of college for a few years now so I haven't voted in too many presidential elections, and local elections don't really matter in Philly because the democrats always win. That being said, I usually vote republican, and I voted for McCain and Romney the last 2 elections. I voted for a few democrats for positions like state representative because the candidates were basically "conservative democrats", but knew they couldn't win on a republican ticket. Last presidential election, Ron Paul really caught my eye. I "wanted" to vote for him, but I knew realistically he had no shot at being president, so I made the "lesser of 2 evils vote" for Romney. From now on I'm voting for who I want to win regardless of the probabilities of that candidate winning. I really hope Rand Paul runs for president, and I'd vote for him regardless if he is running on the republican, independent, or libertarian vote.
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