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led lights
#1
has anyone found decent led bulbs for the home. Im looking for standard size bases so i can get rid of cfl and incandescent bulbs. I have found that using led rope lights work, but over time im loosing sections at a time
"Fighting for peace is like screwing for virginity"

goofin, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#2
goofin;16154 Wrote:has anyone found decent led bulbs for the home. Im looking for standard size bases so i can get rid of cfl and incandescent bulbs. I have found that using led rope lights work, but over time im loosing sections at a time

I've got no problems with the good ole Edison bulb. I read an article in Wired about lighting solutions and it's my understanding several large corporations using Federal grant money are working hard on a feasible LED based lighting solution. Though I'm not sure such a solution has ever been met. LED lights prevent several problems. One being that LED lighting is inherently directional. Creating an omni-directional LED solution requires many LED elements pointed in many directions at once which leads to their second problem. Overheating. The latest and greatest LED solutions I've seen actually had built-in cooling units. Usually water-based. They're also unbelievably expensive.
"As I lay rubber down the street I pray for traction I can keep, but if I spin and begin to slide, please dear God, protect my sweet ride."
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#3
We have a larger house with many, many lighting fixtures and lamps. We are frugal and only turn on what we need, but even the minimum interior and exterior lighting can be ridiculously expensive if it were all incandescent. We are about 95% CFL and have had fantastic experience with them.

Although I keep watching the LED market, these light sources have some inherent issues that should really be addressed before being widely accepted.

Although they produce a brilliant light that pierces and can be seen over great distances they will barely light a room, if at all. The white LED colors are not that natural or pleasant. They are still too expensive, and as Bybloshex has mentioned they are directional and can get hot enough to be self-destructive.

At this point I'd be happy to find little LED bulbs to serve as welcome lamps to put in the windows. All the ones I have seen are too blue/white, too intense, and shine the output in the wrong direction.

I'm interested in seeing what turns up in this thread.
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“Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves.”

William Pitt
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#4
I have no good answers in relation to what is good for the home. I will say that the technology is advancing fast, considering it wasn't too terribly long ago that the only LED's that were available were red ones. Now there's an array of colors and styles. I have no doubts that eventually they'll be something on the market that will be reasonably priced and work well.

The problem will be the built in failure point that I mentioned in another thread. LED's themselves have an incredibly long MTBF. The last thing manufacturers will want to do is sell a bunch of lights that won't be replaced for the next 30 years. You can be sure that there will be some component in the power supply section of the LED bulbs that will be designed to fail within 1 to 2 years, and there will be no way to disassemble them so they can be fixed by the home hobbyist.
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#5
ByblosHex;16163 Wrote:I've got no problems with the good ole Edison bulb. I read an article in Wired about lighting solutions and it's my understanding several large corporations using Federal grant money are working hard on a feasible LED based lighting solution. Though I'm not sure such a solution has ever been met. LED lights prevent several problems. One being that LED lighting is inherently directional. Creating an omni-directional LED solution requires many LED elements pointed in many directions at once which leads to their second problem. Overheating. The latest and greatest LED solutions I've seen actually had built-in cooling units. Usually water-based. They're also unbelievably expensive.

Humm, I had to research that one, because I would have thought that to be false since the traffic lights I've seen that are LED don't melt snow which in turns blocks the light. Apparently they can have heat problems, but not in the conventional sense.

http://ledsmagazine.com/features/2/5/8

I can tell you one thing, whatever type of LED the cops and firemen are using these days are blindingly bright.

Here's an example, old style first, followed by a LED lightbar taken with the same camera (smartphone), about the same distance, on different nights.

The third photo is a firetruck with all red led lightbar


[Image: 20120907_212035.jpg]

[Image: 20120906_233938.jpg]

[Image: 20120927_203556.jpg]
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#6
They are available, but their expensive. Like $30+ a bulb. I work at a Retail store that sells bulbs and we are waiting for some that are more reasonable and you actually get good light out of. I have some of the candleabra based Led 40 watt replacement bulbs at home and I would say a 15 watt Incandescant puts off better light.
Are you a sheep or a sheepdog?
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#7
the rope lights im using have a decent shade of light. i have run them around the perimeter of the room so when i turn them on a 3 am im not blinded.
guess ill just have to wait
"Fighting for peace is like screwing for virginity"

goofin, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#8
I suspect the MTBF to be something that has already been addressed, either manually and for profit reasons, or inherently. I have yet to see any high output LED achieve the 10,000 hours that are claimed. The old control panel style, yes. Low brightness, low power, low heat.

But the extreme high brightness LEDs just don't seem to have it. I don't think they are as durable and I think the heat eventually does them in. I'm thinking the first priorities are sufficient light output, pleasing light color, and reducing the cost. Making them last 10k hours is the last thing to be achieved, and by the time everything else has been resolved we'll already be accustomed to a certain life span, and that little issue will have taken care of itself. Just my .02.

Shrug
“Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves.”

William Pitt
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#9
The thing is, you don't know if it's the LED component itself that failed or some supporting component without actually tearing it apart and testing the junction of the LED. Even those little CREE flashlights have some supporting circuitry. I can guarandamntee you that any LED bulb that's plugged into 120vac has some circuitry in there to convert AC to DC to the voltage that's needed for the bulb. If it's dimmer capable, then there's even a few more components in there.
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#10
I can't wait to see how long they last.

If you've ever been behind a tractor trailer with LED lights, you've seen one with LEDs burned out. Yeah, the ones that supposedly "never need replacing".

The LED third brake light on my truck cap is down to one, or two remaining functional bulbs out of about twelve. My incandescent tail/brake lights have never been replaced in 11 years.
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