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Mentoring the next generation
#1
Now that I'm married again, I have two stepdaughters, ages 15 and 13. They see the prepping that we do, but I want to make things a bit more personal for them. I want to collect a few small, basic items for each of them to keep in their rooms to have in case of a "bug out". For now, "bug out" usually means going over to the grandparents for the day (2 miles away) if they're otherwise going to be home alone during an iffy situation.

I want to do this in the hopes that they will eventually take the bags off to college or wherever the go on their own, and hopefully give some thought to their own preparedness on a larger scale.

Here are the things I have in mind so far:

backpack style bag

headlamp w/ batteries
1 set extra batteries (AAA x 3)

filter water bottle
SOL bivy sack

25' of paracord
folding knife
mini duct tape

Has anyone else done anything like this with the younger folks in their household, and do you have any thoughts or comments about my list?
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#2
My feeling is that if you just live the "lifestyle" of being prepared the children will just go with it and understand. I was actually surprised at my 4yr old daughter the other day when we went out to fill our gas cans and top off the van. I had told her there was a storm coming and we wanted to make sure we had gas. But she also noticed that we weren't buying food or anything else, but lots of other people were. So as we're leaving the gas station she says "we don't need any food because we're prepared, not like the other people here".

I hadn't actually commented to her before about other people not being prepared. She was having a lot of fun getting some of the other things ready for the storm. Plus she was having fun helping me can much of the food I have stored away this summer. She's really understanding what it means to be ready.
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#3
Mrs. Publican grew up as a military brat over seas. She and her sister and Mom always EACH had a BOB by the door - ready for an immediate evac. I will have to ask her what they had in them.

My youngest (3) is slowly being taught the prepping lifestyle BUT no BOB for her yet.

Soon I suspectBig Grin
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#4
I agree with what Streaker said. Just by living the lifestyle, they will pick up certain things. Although, I do believe this depends on age. OP, since your gals are a little older, I still think they will pick up on certain things but it probably wouldn't be a bad idea to introduce them to little things here and there. Good idea having a BOB for each of them. I would let them have a part in packing a bag. It will give you a chance to explain some stuff if they have questions and you can share what your philosophy on what a BOB should be.

GB
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#5
Great post and I like the idea. My girls are in middle school and attend various sleep-overs so I always ask them to make sure they're phone is charged and they each have a small mag-lite with them.

While I definitely think the kids absorb a little about being prepared, we still took the time to talk about it a lot these last few days without power. They clearly saw the difference between how we coped with things compared to most of their friends. Especially for things that mattered to them, tv, internet and hot water for showers.

We were able to correlate those creature comforts with everthing else we had such as plenty of good food, warm clothing, etc.

We're always trying to drive individual responsibility into every decision/choice they make.
Palerider, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#6
gnbrotz;31418 Wrote:..

Has anyone else done anything like this with the younger folks in their household, and do you have any thoughts or comments about my list?

We did this with our two. We did it as a fun activity more than a specific list. Started with the usual sleepover @ friends house, then outdoors in tents. The preparation mindset came along from that experience. They aren't hardcore preppers, but they aren't blind either.
Subject matter expert on questions no one's asking.
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#7
I would throw some of the emergency food bars in there. No prep needed just eat and go. Be careful in which one you choose. I have read that some make you overly thirsty.
You have a right to protect yourself and a duty to protect your family.
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#8
gnbrotz;31418 Wrote:Now that I'm married again, I have two stepdaughters, ages 15 and 13. They see the prepping that we do, but I want to make things a bit more personal for them. I want to collect a few small, basic items for each of them to keep in their rooms to have in case of a "bug out". For now, "bug out" usually means going over to the grandparents for the day (2 miles away) if they're otherwise going to be home alone during an iffy situation.

I want to do this in the hopes that they will eventually take the bags off to college or wherever the go on their own, and hopefully give some thought to their own preparedness on a larger scale.

Here are the things I have in mind so far:

backpack style bag

headlamp w/ batteries
1 set extra batteries (AAA x 3)

filter water bottle
SOL bivy sack

25' of paracord
folding knife
mini duct tape

Has anyone else done anything like this with the younger folks in their household, and do you have any thoughts or comments about my list?

I've found with my two girls that, with a little effort, they can be taught to be more prepared than the rest of their cohort in a manner in which they don't realize that they are being taught to "prep." They think that they came up with the idea. Yeah, it's passive agressive, but it's working.

The materials have been worked in to their lifestyle piece by piece. The headlamps they were given before we went salamander hunting at night one late March evening while the herps were breeding. The paracord was introduced in the form of paracord bracelets, which both daughters love to make and sell in school. The same goes with duct tape for purses, book covers, etc. They both have tons of that stuff and bring it along just for fun anyway.

They've been given their own knives since they turned 8. They each have multiples and one is usually thrown in their packs when we go away. They don't have bivys. Haven't really gotten in to that yet, although they both have been taught how to build shelters while attending outdoor programs w/ our scout troop.

Both daughters are slowly learning things like wild edibles. I gave a field trip w/ elder daughter's class last year and the other kids were in awe of how much she knew.

Same w/ first aid kits, ferro rods for fire making, knot tying, navigation, etc.........Kids like to do stuff. Make it fun and they'll learn to do stuff. It works even better if they can learn in a setting where someone else is teaching it. That way it isn't just something that dad likes to do, it's something that's worth teaching a program on. Kinda the same principle as why you let someone else teach your wife how to drive a standard transmission car. From you it's criticism. From someone else, it is a good idea and sound wisdom.

As was said upthread, just teach them as if there was no other way to do things and they'll pick it up as they go.

We don't really have BOBs. The good thing w/ girls is that they are more organized than boys are. They typically keep all of the stuff that they like in a box under their beds anyway, so it'd be easy to grab stuff quickly if needed.
A knifeless man is a lifeless man - Nordic proverb
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#9
Apparently living the lifestyle gets picked up pretty early in life.

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#10
streaker69;44452 Wrote:Apparently living the lifestyle gets picked up pretty early in life.

[Image: p1010507u.jpg]

Your boy looks like he could be a relation of mine on my Mother's side. Do you have any family with the last name Carroll in your family?
You have a right to protect yourself and a duty to protect your family.
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