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Now we're off to ban plinkers
#1
http://money.cnn.com/2013/05/03/news/com...index.html


The shooting of a two-year-old girl by her five-year-old brother has put a spotlight on smaller guns designed for children.
The gun used in the recent shooting in Kentucky was a Crickett .22-caliber rifle, marketed with the slogan "My First Rifle," from Keystone Sporting Arms in Milton, Pa. The single-shot rifle uses the smallest caliber available and is sold by major retailers, including Wal-Mart (WMT, Fortune 500), Cabela's (CAB) and Gander Mountain.
The Crickett website was down Friday due to "difficulties," according to John Renzulli, an attorney representing Keystone . But the site for Chipmunk, another Keystone brand, exhibited "quality firearms for America's youth" on its site, including .22-caliber rifles and pistols, with photos of children shooting them. The site includes a "kids corner" section.

Dodgy
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#2
and of COURSE its the GUNS fault....

Just amazing that a totally stupid parent leaves a loaded firearm accessible to a child who takes it and shoots it and ALL guns are to blame... dont blame the parent, dont blame poor firearm training, and dont blame the ammunition but put ALL the blame on the company that makes the gun or the gun itself.

This "person" should be charged with negligent homicide and sterilized to insure that no more of his genes are in the pool.
You want to take my guns away ???? SCREW YOU ............
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#3
Would they be happier if our kids had to learn proper gun safety and handling on big heavy guns that are hard to hold, too bulky to have safe muzzle discipline, and chambered in cartridges that recoil so much that the gun is uncontrollable for them?
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#4
bac0nfat;100113 Wrote:Would they be happier if our kids had to learn proper gun safety and handling on big heavy guns that are hard to hold, too bulky to have safe muzzle discipline, and chambered in cartridges that recoil so much that the gun is uncontrollable for them?

I think they would be happier if you sheltered your kids from firearms. Dodgy
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#5
Dang... I was just thinking of getting one for my daughter. Just had her first birthday!

Better get one now before they double in price. Of course, proper training and securing the firearm(s) in the home is a foregone conclusion.
tolerance for failure meter... LOW
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#6
Which I always thought was a dumb idea. You don't hide scissors in a locked safe, behinds closed doors and not tell your kids. You explain that they are not toys, and not to play with them.

I would prefer firearm safety training to be a part of school for younger kids.
This will be the best security for maintaining our liberties. A nation of well-informed men who have been taught to know and prize the rights which God has given them cannot be enslaved. It is in the religion of ignorance that tyranny begins. -Ben Franklin
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#7
I have no clue why a parent would buy something like that for their five year old....and if they happened to be mature enough to use it, why they did not monitor it.

Even with the BB gun we have (and can't use, stupid Middletown Township laws)...we didn't just give it to our son and say "have at it"...he knew it was a gift to be used only with parental supervision, and he wasn't even allowed to keep it in his bedroom. It's locked up with the other rifles.

My five year old definitely isn't mature enough to handle a real .22. And I personally do not know many who are. A few of you, I think, maybe have some who are, but still...none of them are mature enough to have free access to them, even if they know how to shoot.
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#8
I think it is perfectly fine to teach young kids (by that I mean 5+ years old) to shoot, especially using youth model .22s, etc. However I think responsible firearm owners should keep these guns out of the hands of unsupervised children. Whether you keep these firearms in safes, gun cabinets, gun cases w/ padlocks, or AT LEAST use a trigger lock then that is perfectly fine. I'm not a parent, so I cannot comment on when I think the appropriate age is to have an unsecured firearm located in your house so that your children can use it in an emergency, but I can say with confidence if your youngest child is at least below the age of 16, then keep your guns locked up. If you feel worried leaving a 15 year old home alone without access to a firearm to defend themselves against an intruder while you are out, then get a burglar alarm system and tell them if they hear the alarm go off and it isn't turned off right away then they need to lock themselves in their bedroom (or any bedroom), hide under the bed or in the closet until they hear a relative's voice, and dial 911.

Again, I do not have any kids and my opinion is regarding children in general. I know there are probably some younger kids out there more mature than some adults we see, so my opinion does not apply to every single kid/family. We must realize it is important to prevent these tragedies not only to save human lives, but also to help prevent more of our second amendment rights from being stripped away. Gun grabbers politicize the hell out of these tragedies to push their agenda and strip us of our rights. Sometimes we can be our own worst enemies.
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#9
RugerGirl;100136 Wrote:I have no clue why a parent would buy something like that for their five year old....and if they happened to be mature enough to use it, why they did not monitor it.

Even with the BB gun we have (and can't use, stupid Middletown Township laws)...we didn't just give it to our son and say "have at it"...he knew it was a gift to be used only with parental supervision, and he wasn't even allowed to keep it in his bedroom. It's locked up with the other rifles.

My five year old definitely isn't mature enough to handle a real .22. And I personally do not know many who are. A few of you, I think, maybe have some who are, but still...none of them are mature enough to have free access to them, even if they know how to shoot.

One of my boys was 5 when I bought them their first rifle. Before I got my safe, it was locked up in it's case in our room, now it's in the safe. We thoroughly went over firearms safety and even our little girl knows that guns aren't toys and something to be played with. Regardless of all that, we won't give them free access to it, mostly because kids can be forgetful that's just kid nature.
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#10
I'm pretty sure that I'd be a domestic terrorist if I was 7 in these times, as I walked around with my 22 dispatching many many small creatures. The neighbors were thankful for a reduced pest problem. I started a few years before that, but it was 6 or 7 before I could walk around with it by myself.

Justin
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