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Prepping for 1-2 weeks?
#1
So my question is, what is appropriate for a one to two week plan?

I figure that, instead of looking at being able to bug-in for months on end, if I can start with making sure I'm OK for 7-14 days, the task will be more achievable. Then I can slowly build up from there. I'm not a SHTF'er, but would like to be comfortable (for the moment) should we get a blizzard that knocks out power for a week or two, a trucker strike, or some other short term scenario that may shut things down.

Generally speaking, I'm pretty confident that I have most things on hand to help me out, but they're not really organized in any way.

I have a garage full of tool, camping equipment, etc, with plenty of duplicates that I can put together in a 'kit' so to speak. So that's not really an issue.

I have a large family room, with a fireplace, and a full cord of wood. So if the heat goes out, we could semi-comfortabley live down there if need be.

Have a nice propane grill, and always have at least two full bottles on hand. So actual cooking should be doable for a week or two, should the gas go out (worst case, I could probably cook in the fireplace over the fire).


My real concern, for getting started, is how much food and water is considered appropriate for two weeks? For one person? How about for a family of three with a dog?

What other consumables should I be considering for a two week stint?
- How much TP?
- How many candles?
- Is two tanks of propane enough to 'grill-out' the whole time?
- Recommended quantity of batteries (per item)
- Other consumable?


Like I said, I want to start prepping for short term. Rome wasn't built in a day. Once I feel comfortable with a short-term scenario, I can build upon that - out to a month, then three, or six, or even a year - but you gotta start somewhere, right?
jaseman, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Dec 2012.
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#2
Your approach is a pretty solid way to start out. My wife and I started out with a similar plan, eventually two weeks turned into a month, a month to two months, etc. I had to let her take the reigns with the food situation. She does our regular grocery shopping, she has a far better view of what we consume. I also had a hard time at first getting into the mindset of bare essentials. Had I gone out and done it by myself, I would have been stocking up on the things we eat regularly now while everything is fine and dandy.

Keeping two bottles of propane on hand is probably sufficient for two weeks, though I would consider three; two is one and one is none. Is your wood stove that you mentioned setup in a way that you would be able to cook on it?
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#3
There's a lot to be covered. The number one most important thing you need to survive is water. Cover that first. Without a good sustainable source of water, you will die, no matter how much food, guns, ammo, medicine, etc. you have.

Having water on hand is a good start, but you really need something sustainable. Try to have a gallon of water per person, per day, at minimum. Once you have a good amount on hand, figure out how you will get potable water once you run out. If you have a well, figure out a way to get the water out in the absence of electricity. A generator is good, but a hand pump is better, as it doesn't require fuel. If you don't have a well, you'll have to figure something else out. Think rainwater collection, local stream, etc. Then build a high-volume water filter. Streaker69 has a good thread on building one.

Food can be stockpiled pretty easily. A good start is buying extra canned goods every time you run to the store. Buy small (individual serving) cans to reduce waste, and try to only buy stuff that is on sale. But just like water, you need to consider sustainability for food, too. That means gardening and hunting/trapping. If you don't already have these skills, learn them.

There's a lot more to consider, but that should get you started.
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#4
csmith;93158 Wrote:...Keeping two bottles of propane on hand is probably sufficient for two weeks, though I would consider three; two is one and one is none. Is your wood stove that you mentioned setup in a way that you would be able to cook on it?

As I said, it's an actual fireplace, not a wood stove. Any cooking done would be akin to cooking over an open campfire (which I've done a fair amount of over the years). It's not set up for cooking, but worst case scenario, I could heat a can of soup in the coals, make mountain pies, or boil water for noodles or rice.
jaseman, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Dec 2012.
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#5
If you got a fireplace then you need a Dutch Oven, and a book of Dutch Oven recipes. If you go this route, I highly recommend you practice using a Dutch Oven before you actually need to rely upon it.

We have a woodstove, a big grill and two Coleman Camp Stoves, and enough LP to last us for a while. I like the Coleman Camp Stoves, as they could easily be used in the garage with the door open. Not sure I'd want to actually use them in the house though.
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#6
bac0nfat;93161 Wrote:There's a lot to be covered. The number one most important thing you need to survive is water. Cover that first. Without a good sustainable source of water, you will die, no matter how much food, guns, ammo, medicine, etc. you have.

Having water on hand is a good start, but you really need something sustainable. Try to have a gallon of water per person, per day, at minimum. Once you have a good amount on hand, figure out how you will get potable water once you run out. If you have a well, figure out a way to get the water out in the absence of electricity. A generator is good, but a hand pump is better, as it doesn't require fuel. If you don't have a well, you'll have to figure something else out. Think rainwater collection, local stream, etc. Then build a high-volume water filter. Streaker69 has a good thread on building one.

Food can be stockpiled pretty easily. A good start is buying extra canned goods every time you run to the store. Buy small (individual serving) cans to reduce waste, and try to only buy stuff that is on sale. But just like water, you need to consider sustainability for food, too. That means gardening and hunting/trapping. If you don't already have these skills, learn them.

There's a lot more to consider, but that should get you started.

While sustainable water is something I would like to consider in the long term, my main goal, at the moment is short term. As I said, 7-14 days. So I guess that means I should have roughly 50-60 gallons on hand for a family of three?

Living in the 'burbs, I don't have a well, nor is digging one really an option. I have however, been seriously considering some sort of rainwater collection system, built in to my shed, once I rebuild it this spring. But agin, that's more long term, and not the focus of my immediate plans.

I do, honestly, appreciate the input though.
jaseman, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Dec 2012.
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#7
jaseman;93168 Wrote:Living in the 'burbs, I don't have a well, nor is digging one really an option. I have however, been seriously considering some sort of rainwater collection system, built in to my shed, once I rebuild it this spring. But agin, that's more long term, and not the focus of my immediate plans.

I do, honestly, appreciate the input though.

I replied to something very similar to this a couple days ago, but I'll repeat it just in case. Collecting rainwater is a good idea and I support anyone that does it, but it isn't potable, just in case you thought it was. Any water that you collect will still need to be filtered and then purified, and that takes time and resources. Even the bigger filters will take a couple to a few hours to get enough water to use through them.

In your case, I would recommend that you get yourself a 55gallon foodsafe drum stick it in your basement/garage and just fill it with tap water. Treat it with a little bit of bleach and seal it up. You'll have potable water ready on demand.
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#8
It depends on quite a few things. I see you just mentioned a family of three.

For food, what I would suggest, if you want to start out. Get canned food. Vegetables, or even things like spaghetti and ravioli can stack up quite easily. As for a meal, a can of spaghetti might not be gourmet, but it will keep you going.

Water has already been covered. But I would suggest getting more than you think you need. Sanitation needs are important, and can use up a good deal of water.

Batteries depend on what all you will be running. Flashlights? Lanterns? Radio? What I would suggest, is enough batteries to change out three times for every device. Now, some things burn through batteries, other things are not that bad. So it depends on how long your items last, and what items you plan to use more than others.

One big thing, I think is forgotten alot. Is entertainment. A few good books, board games, things like that will make the time go by faster. A week without power doesn't sound too bad. But when you can't check your email, or watch youtube, or TV. Things tend to drag on.
This will be the best security for maintaining our liberties. A nation of well-informed men who have been taught to know and prize the rights which God has given them cannot be enslaved. It is in the religion of ignorance that tyranny begins. -Ben Franklin
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#9
Connal;93179 Wrote:Batteries depend on what all you will be running. Flashlights? Lanterns? Radio? What I would suggest, is enough batteries to change out three times for every device. Now, some things burn through batteries, other things are not that bad. So it depends on how long your items last, and what items you plan to use more than others.

I've been collecting rechargeable batteries for devices. Getting a solar charger for them has worked to, but I can also plug the charger into my generator if need be. Something to think about, you'd get a lot more uses out of rechargeables than regular alkaline.

There is a trade off though. Some devices, like high output LED flashlights chew through rechargeables rather fast, and you don't get the same level of illumination out of them. But they do work in a pinch.
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#10
Streaker,
I did know that rainwater wasn't potable. But figured that since I'm rebuilding the shed, it'd be easy enough to run a gutter and downspout (or other collection method) to a 55 gal drum. Be good for flushing toilets, watering plants, or whatever.

Not real keen on putting a 55 gal drum in the garage though. Takes up too much space. I was thinking more along the lines of spreading it out in 1 gal jugs, and 5 or 10 gal containers. Makes it a bit easier for me to store some in the pantry, some on shelves or under counters in storage rooms or the garage. Plus, I can move it around much easier if needed. Any thoughts on some good containers for water in the 5-10 gallon range?


And I like the Dutch Oven idea.
jaseman, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Dec 2012.
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