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Public Water and Sewer
#1
Dumb question, but I was thinking... I have public water and sewer. Will those continue to function normally if there is a power outage? I know the hot water heater won't work...

Just something I'm thinking about with the impending "storm"
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RocketFoot's Minion since 09-07-2012
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#2
Generally, yes. Although, depending on location of the sewage treatment plant, and the integrity of the lines, flooding/severe rain could pose an issue for the sewage side.
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#3
They almost never fail because of something like this. Storm drains can back up but rarely a big problem with the sanitary sewer.
Take this trouble for me: Make sure my shepherd dog remains a working dog, for I have struggled all my life long for that aim ~ Max von Stephanitz

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#4
Exbiker;30886 Wrote:They almost never fail because of something like this. Storm drains can back up but rarely a big problem with the sanitary sewer.

Unless a pump station shuts down because of an extended power failure. Then you'll have an overflow of the sanitary sewer.

The other issue that most people won't know about is if the increase in flow due to Inflow and Infiltration overwhelms the treatment plant and they just have to let the excess water flow through. In older sanitary sewer systems with lots of cracked pipes and manholes flooded with water, a treatment plant can sometimes see triple the amount of flow they normally would. If a plant is already running close to their maximum capacity triple the amount of flow will cause big problems.

In cities where they have a combined system (sanitary and storm) it's very possible to have shit running in the street because of the increase in water. If I recall there was an article about that exact thing in one of the Philly news just a few weeks ago. Apparently in one particular area whenever they get a lot of rain the sanitary sewer overflows directly onto the street.
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#5
Not sure about sewer but most water authorities have backup generators.

Still it's a good idea to prepare and not rely on something that someone else is controling, and claims not to worry.
Welcome to ObamaNation part deuxUtg
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#6
bigdawgbeav;30878 Wrote:Dumb question, but I was thinking... I have public water and sewer. Will those continue to function normally if there is a power outage? I know the hot water heater won't work...

Just something I'm thinking about with the impending "storm"

Why not? Do you have an electric water heater as opposed to gas?
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#7
God's Country;30957 Wrote:Not sure about sewer but most water authorities have backup generators.

Still it's a good idea to prepare and not rely on something that someone else is controling, and claims not to worry.

Sewer pump stations will have back up generators based upon the size of the station. The smaller "can" stations generally won't have backups. Those are the types of stations that all you see above ground is a manhole and an electrical box. They're normally placed around developments and push their flow to larger stations.

The larger stations will have generators but generally only have fuel for a day or two. It takes a lot of energy to run 3 or 4 450HP pumps, in normal flow days a station might only run one pump to keep up with the flow. In high flow days they might run 3 to 4 pumps.

I've seen one station that had 4 450HP pumps and was running all four of them at around 80% speed just to keep up with the flow. That's around 48,000gpm/pump.
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#8
Emptymag;30960 Wrote:
bigdawgbeav;30878 Wrote:Dumb question, but I was thinking... I have public water and sewer. Will those continue to function normally if there is a power outage? I know the hot water heater won't work...

Just something I'm thinking about with the impending "storm"

Why not? Do you have an electric water heater as opposed to gas?
I have an oil-fired hot water heater, but it requires electricity to run. I suspect the same is true of most gas hot water heaters.
I am not a lawyer.
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#9
twency;31095 Wrote:
Emptymag;30960 Wrote:Why not? Do you have an electric water heater as opposed to gas?
I have an oil-fired hot water heater, but it requires electricity to run. I suspect the same is true of most gas hot water heaters.

Nope. Not mine anyway.
I have all the hot water I want when the power is out.

Gas water heater:
1. Connect water lines.
2. Ignite pilot light.
3. Enjoy hot water any time.

Repeat every 8-10 years when tank rusts through. Wink
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#10
Emptymag;31188 Wrote:
twency;31095 Wrote:I have an oil-fired hot water heater, but it requires electricity to run. I suspect the same is true of most gas hot water heaters.

Nope. Not mine anyway.
I have all the hot water I want when the power is out.

Gas water heater:
1. Connect water lines.
2. Ignite pilot light.
3. Enjoy hot water any time.

Repeat every 8-10 years when tank rusts through. Wink
I'm unclear on how that would work. For example, what triggers the thing to light up (beyond pilot stage)? A mechanical thermostat I guess?
I am not a lawyer.
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