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Red Dot Pistols
#1
Ok, took a bunch of instructor training last year. There is quite a buzz about red dots on pistols, i.e. Glock MOS, Sig P320 RX, etc...

Are any of you running these, Trijicon, Romeo 1, etc..., on your carry pistols, not comp guns?
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#2
I don't know if I'd run one on my carry gun, but I'm thinking of putting one on my Super Blackhawk for hunting.  Might work out decent for carry, but I'd want to make sure I could cowitness the sights just in case it failed for some reason.
RL Suehr, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Aug 2013.
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#3
I had a red dot on my AR. I didn't like it. I found that unlike a laser a red dot takes longer to correctly acquire the target. What I mean is with the red dot you have to be sure your head eyes and everything is lined up perfectly with every shot for it to be of any real use. The red dot I had did not have any crosshairs which may have been part of the problem, I don't know and I can't tell about a red dot for a pistol either. I have a laser on my Ruger SR1911 and it hits what it's on pretty much all the time if I don't jerk my shots.
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#4
Now that they seem to have seriously extended battery life, AND as long as I can co witness the iron?  I would be down with a Sig P320 RX.  Especially at the Instructor price.

But then the cost of all those new holsters???
Dannytheman, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#5
(03-19-2017, 06:00 AM)soberbyker Wrote: I had a red dot on my AR. I didn't like it. I found that unlike a laser a red dot takes longer to correctly acquire the target. What I mean is with the red dot you have to be sure your head eyes and everything is lined up perfectly with every shot for it to be of any real use. The red dot I had did not have any crosshairs which may have been part of the problem, I don't know and I can't tell about a red dot for a pistol either. I have a laser on my Ruger SR1911 and it hits what it's on pretty much all the time if I don't jerk my shots.

Yes, red dots are slower, that's why all the Open class competitors run them in competition..... Angel Confused
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#6
(03-26-2017, 01:39 PM)ivwarrior Wrote:
(03-19-2017, 06:00 AM)soberbyker Wrote: I had a red dot on my AR. I didn't like it. I found that unlike a laser a red dot takes longer to correctly acquire the target. What I mean is with the red dot you have to be sure your head eyes and everything is lined up perfectly with every shot for it to be of any real use. The red dot I had did not have any crosshairs which may have been part of the problem, I don't know and I can't tell about a red dot for a pistol either. I have a laser on my Ruger SR1911 and it hits what it's on pretty much all the time if I don't jerk my shots.

Yes, red dots are slower, that's why all the Open class competitors run them in competition..... Angel Confused

It was slower for me, as I mentioned maybe if it had crosshairs it would have been better, but it didn't it was just a red dot in a plain open circle I didn't like it, couldn't get used to it, my shots were off more than on, I gave MY opinion, works for you ... great.  Shrug Dodgy
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#7
Red dot sights are often misunderstood. Used properly and they're amazingly quick with getting on target, and accurately on target.

The purpose behind a red dot is to shift focus away from the front sight post, and onto the target/threat. This is already a natural thing for people under stress; near focus disappears and the person focuses entirely on the threat. This will continue to occur unless a person is thoroughly trained against it.

Since a person often focuses on the threat, rather than the front sight post, the red dot can help take advantage of that. Keep your focus on the target, and bring the dot to the target. Dot is on target, pull the trigger. Do not focus on the dot; that's what tends to slow people down.

Another problem people have that slows them down is that they are trying to find the dot. Again, that's from being used to having a front sight post. Don't bring your eyes to the dot, just bring the gun up naturally; the dot will find your eyes. If the dot isn't in front of you when you bring the gun up, then you need to adjust your presentation. After some repetition this'll feel much more natural. This is because you're already doing what your body would naturally do: focus on the target and just bring the gun up to meet the target.

RMRs (handgun mountable red dots in general) have gotten much better since their inception. While I wouldn't call them bomb proof, they are more rugged than before. Additionally, are you really expecting to use your pistol as a hammer, with the flat of the RMR being the strike face? They're tough enough to withstand the typical knocks and bumps of carry; anything more is an extreme case. If the RMR itself goes down, revert back to your irons, which can be added and cowitnessed.

An additional perk is that they are extremely visible and intuitive to use in lowlight conditions. While I will never advocate taking a shot without first positively IDing the target, they are useful in having sights on target ahead of time for when you do flash it before seeing if you need to take the shot. You can do this with night sights (tritium powered fiber such as the TruGlo TFX included), but it's slower and less forgiving than just having the dot track to where you want it.

Battery life has become sufficient to last at least a year before requiring swapping out. Solution to the battery problem? Change them once a year. Christmas, boom. Or birthday. Or whenever.

It boils down to understanding the concept behind the dot, and practicing with it.

The biggest drawback is the cost. That goes for the optic itself, and the gear that goes with it. You need a holster that'll be capable of having an RMR, and while there are plenty, that's still an added expense. There's also the cost of getting new suppressor height sights to cowitness with the optic. And then there's the cost of training with your new optic to get a good feel for it.

They aren't absolutely necessary, but they definitely have their merits. For someone who's trying to get more performance out of their gun, and has the budget, this is a good option. For someone who's having eye problems (older guys), this is also an option. This will not magically get you on target faster.

Food for thought.

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