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Sharpening an EDC blade
#21
Sharpening is not hard at all I can't imagine paying someone else to do it. My wife also appreciates having kitchen knives that actually work and can cut a tomato without mauling it. I sharpen without and guides or anything. About once every so often I gather up all the knives in the house. Lay a ratty towel down of the coffee table and my whetstone along with requisite beer in front of the TV. Then just steadily drag the blades across the stone making sure the actual angle of cutting edge is parallel with the stone itself, start with the stone at the base of the knife and as you drag across the stone pull the blade across on the other axis slowly and evenly so by the end of a swipe you've covered the entire length of the blade. Don't bother oiling the stone or adding water it just causes it to clog up. Generally I only make passes in one direction on one side and then once I feel I've ground one side enough I flip it over and do the other side (this depends on the type of cutting edge the knife has). Use the rough side of the stone 1st obviously then finish up with the fine edge. If you want to get something literally razor sharp you need to finish by using a stop, but the stone will get you 90% of the way there. Denim from an old pair of blue jeans makes a nice strop in a pinch.

Just as an aside; keep some denim in your linen closet outside your bathroom or in the medicine cabinet. Then once every few days run your face razor (it works on disposables too) across the jeans in the OPPOSITE direction you would draw it across your face 10 or 15 times. Your disposable cartridges will easily last 2 months doing this. Trust me with the insane cost of cartridges what it is these days by the end of the year spending 1 minute every so often will save you a significant amount of money. Those guys who make disposable cartridges ought to be taken to task by the courts for collusion and price fixing, its criminal. We all know that box of cartridges cost them 20 cents to make that they sell for 30 dollars.
The forum poster formerly known as Emoticon...
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#22
i picked up one
http://www.amazon.com/Lansky-PS-MED01-Bl...rds=lansky
morpheus6d9, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Oct 2012.
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#23
Emoticon;26333 Wrote:Sharpening is not hard at all I can't imagine paying someone else to do it. My wife also appreciates having kitchen knives that actually work and can cut a tomato without mauling it. I sharpen without and guides or anything. About once every so often I gather up all the knives in the house. Lay a ratty towel down of the coffee table and my whetstone along with requisite beer in front of the TV. Then just steadily drag the blades across the stone making sure the actual angle of cutting edge is parallel with the stone itself, start with the stone at the base of the knife and as you drag across the stone pull the blade across on the other axis slowly and evenly so by the end of a swipe you've covered the entire length of the blade. Don't bother oiling the stone or adding water it just causes it to clog up. Generally I only make passes in one direction on one side and then once I feel I've ground one side enough I flip it over and do the other side (this depends on the type of cutting edge the knife has). Use the rough side of the stone 1st obviously then finish up with the fine edge. If you want to get something literally razor sharp you need to finish by using a stop, but the stone will get you 90% of the way there. Denim from an old pair of blue jeans makes a nice strop in a pinch.

Just as an aside; keep some denim in your linen closet outside your bathroom or in the medicine cabinet. Then once every few days run your face razor (it works on disposables too) across the jeans in the OPPOSITE direction you would draw it across your face 10 or 15 times. Your disposable cartridges will easily last 2 months doing this. Trust me with the insane cost of cartridges what it is these days by the end of the year spending 1 minute every so often will save you a significant amount of money. Those guys who make disposable cartridges ought to be taken to task by the courts for collusion and price fixing, its criminal. We all know that box of cartridges cost them 20 cents to make that they sell for 30 dollars.

Plain denim isn't abrasive enough to refine an edge by itself. Maybe something softer than steel, but not steel. You'd need an abrasive compound on/in the denim.
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#24
Rwb1500;26726 Wrote:
Emoticon;26333 Wrote:Sharpening is not hard at all I can't imagine paying someone else to do it. My wife also appreciates having kitchen knives that actually work and can cut a tomato without mauling it. I sharpen without and guides or anything. About once every so often I gather up all the knives in the house. Lay a ratty towel down of the coffee table and my whetstone along with requisite beer in front of the TV. Then just steadily drag the blades across the stone making sure the actual angle of cutting edge is parallel with the stone itself, start with the stone at the base of the knife and as you drag across the stone pull the blade across on the other axis slowly and evenly so by the end of a swipe you've covered the entire length of the blade. Don't bother oiling the stone or adding water it just causes it to clog up. Generally I only make passes in one direction on one side and then once I feel I've ground one side enough I flip it over and do the other side (this depends on the type of cutting edge the knife has). Use the rough side of the stone 1st obviously then finish up with the fine edge. If you want to get something literally razor sharp you need to finish by using a stop, but the stone will get you 90% of the way there. Denim from an old pair of blue jeans makes a nice strop in a pinch.

Just as an aside; keep some denim in your linen closet outside your bathroom or in the medicine cabinet. Then once every few days run your face razor (it works on disposables too) across the jeans in the OPPOSITE direction you would draw it across your face 10 or 15 times. Your disposable cartridges will easily last 2 months doing this. Trust me with the insane cost of cartridges what it is these days by the end of the year spending 1 minute every so often will save you a significant amount of money. Those guys who make disposable cartridges ought to be taken to task by the courts for collusion and price fixing, its criminal. We all know that box of cartridges cost them 20 cents to make that they sell for 30 dollars.

Plain denim isn't abrasive enough to refine an edge by itself. Maybe something softer than steel, but not steel. You'd need an abrasive compound on/in the denim.

Yeah if you were trying to sharpen a hard steel blade compound would definitely help. I have no idea what type of steel the disposable razor blade cartridges are made of, I suspect it's shit so that they dull faster and they can get you to buy more. I've been running my disposable cartridges over denim for a while now and it really does help by itself with no compound. Give it a shot if you don't believe me.
The forum poster formerly known as Emoticon...
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#25
Emoticon;26728 Wrote:
Rwb1500;26726 Wrote:Plain denim isn't abrasive enough to refine an edge by itself. Maybe something softer than steel, but not steel. You'd need an abrasive compound on/in the denim.

Yeah if you were trying to sharpen a hard steel blade compound would definitely help. I have no idea what type of steel the disposable razor blade cartridges are made of, I suspect it's shit so that they dull faster and they can get you to buy more. I've been running my disposable cartridges over denim for a while now and it really does help by itself with no compound. Give it a shot if you don't believe me.

I can vouch for denim keeping an edge on a Gilette Mach 3 for months. I haven't used compound.
TheWolff, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#26
bac0nfat;2725 Wrote:If you are like me, and can't get a blade sharp by freehanding with a bench stone, do yourself a favor and get this:

http://www.amazon.com/Lansky-Deluxe-5-St...pening+kit 

I'm able to get a razor sharp edge on any knife in just a few minutes, and the results are consistent.


+1 for the Lansky. I haven't tried any of the others that are similar but I've had my Lansky for at least 15 years and would recommend it to anyone. I can put a real nice edge on most blades freehand with a whetstone but when something is this quick, easy and foolproof why use anything else?
Truth be told, there are many stones available for the Lansky but I typically only use two, the medium and the fine. I'll use an extra coarse to establish an edge or change the degree of an existing edge and I'll use an extra fine for some special knives but I can get an excellent edge in just a few minutes with the two basic stones.

If you buy the Lansky do yourself a huge favor and spring a few extra $$ for the base, it makes it so much easier.
[Image: LK-LM007.jpg]
I'm a cheap SOB, I made my own base from scraps, but not everyone has easy access to the tools and free materials.
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Emoticon;26333 Wrote:Don't bother oiling the stone or adding water it just causes it to clog up.

I don't agree with that, oil actually helps keep the pores of the stone from clogging when you use enough. If you don't use enough it will form a paste that will clog the pores.
I don't use oil because I don't want the knives I use on food to be oiled with honing oil of origins unknown to me and it's a bit messy if you use enough oil. On the rare occasion that I do use oil I use vegetable oil.
When I wanted to clean the steel particles out of the pores of my stones I'd use vegetable oil and a small wire brush or a new stiff toothbrush. I've since bought an ultrasonic cleaner, plain water in that unit works great for cleaning out the pores of the stones.
There are three types of people in the world:
Those who make things happen,
Those who watch things happen,
And those who wonder what happened.
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#27
mauser;26759 Wrote:
bac0nfat;2725 Wrote:If you are like me, and can't get a blade sharp by freehanding with a bench stone, do yourself a favor and get this:

http://www.amazon.com/Lansky-Deluxe-5-St...pening+kit 

I'm able to get a razor sharp edge on any knife in just a few minutes, and the results are consistent.


+1 for the Lansky. I haven't tried any of the others that are similar but I've had my Lansky for at least 15 years and would recommend it to anyone. I can put a real nice edge on most blades freehand with a whetstone but when something is this quick, easy and foolproof why use anything else?
Truth be told, there are many stones available for the Lansky but I typically only use two, the medium and the fine. I'll use an extra coarse to establish an edge or change the degree of an existing edge and I'll use an extra fine for some special knives but I can get an excellent edge in just a few minutes with the two basic stones.

If you buy the Lansky do yourself a huge favor and spring a few extra $$ for the base, it makes it so much easier.
[Image: LK-LM007.jpg]
I'm a cheap SOB, I made my own base from scraps, but not everyone has easy access to the tools and free materials.
[Image: iof5f6.jpg]

Emoticon;26333 Wrote:Don't bother oiling the stone or adding water it just causes it to clog up.

I don't agree with that, oil actually helps keep the pores of the stone from clogging when you use enough. If you don't use enough it will form a paste that will clog the pores.
I don't use oil because I don't want the knives I use on food to be oiled with honing oil of origins unknown to me and it's a bit messy if you use enough oil. On the rare occasion that I do use oil I use vegetable oil.
When I wanted to clean the steel particles out of the pores of my stones I'd use vegetable oil and a small wire brush or a new stiff toothbrush. I've since bought an ultrasonic cleaner, plain water in that unit works great for cleaning out the pores of the stones.

If you go and look at the techniques of professional knife sharpeners, like the people chefs mail their knives to never use any kind of compound or oil on their equipment from what I've seen until the final stages of honing and stropping. More often than not they usually just use a combination belt/drum sander and not even a stone. Personally though, while oil does make it slip across the stone better, I still prefer a dry stone.
The forum poster formerly known as Emoticon...
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#28
I use a combination of oils and cold water for my stones. Water keeps the stone from heating up (step rubbing stone? Friction, anyone?), which will cause the stone to become too porous. If I have a serious shaping/sharpening/honing job, I'll freeze the blade overnight, and use a can of compressed air to keep it cooled down (spray the can upside down) while I'm working on it. A bucket of ice water is also handy.
Unbanned since September 2012.
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#29
Emoticon;26898 Wrote:If you go and look at the techniques of professional knife sharpeners, like the people chefs mail their knives to never use any kind of compound or oil on their equipment from what I've seen until the final stages of honing and stropping. More often than not they usually just use a combination belt/drum sander and not even a stone. Personally though, while oil does make it slip across the stone better, I still prefer a dry stone.

And if you watch a professional chef you'll see many of them maintaining their edge with a sharpening steel.
[Image: th?id=I.4841549884490236&pid=15.1]

They are very effective at keeping a good knife very sharp if you know when and how to use them.
I have a few but they are practically useless to me for two reasons.
1) I've never learned how to properly use one.
2) I always let my knife get beyond the point of being maintained by a sharpening steel.
They're made to maintain a good edge, not to sharpen a dull knife.
There are three types of people in the world:
Those who make things happen,
Those who watch things happen,
And those who wonder what happened.
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#30
For quick touch-ups, I just use Smith's Pocket Pal.

[Image: whlgdv.jpg]


If I want to go the whole nine yards, I have a set of Arkansas stones and honing oil. I have a leather strop with jeweler's rouge for finishing the edge. In a pinch, you can use a piece of that grey cardboard from the back of a legal pad for a strop as well.
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I enjoy every minute of it.
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