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Simple Money Saving tips
#1
I'm sure everyone is looking for ways to save on money when shopping for groceries and such. Let's share ideas on ways to do it. Here's a start.

1. Don't buy prepackaged grated cheese. You pay a premium for someone to run the cheese through a grater and then package it. Most of the grocery stores have hunks of popular cheeses for less than the pre-packaged. Get a four sided cheese grater and do it yourself.

2. Don't buy pre-cut boneless pork chops. Buy an entire pork loin and cut it yourself to your own thickness. Do this when the stores are running their BOGO deals. Freeze what you don't use sealed in food saver bags.

3. I've found Tuesday's are a good day to hit the meat counters. Most grocery stores have meat that's coming close to it's No-Sell date in it's own area. Buy it and either use it immediately or freeze it sealed in food saver bags.

4. Don't buy the smaller bags of sugar and flour. Get yourself some buckets that they can be sealed in, and buy the 50lb bags from your local bulk food store. Re-fill your every day use containers from your stores.

5. Don't buy ground pork, if you can find it in a store. You're paying a premium for someone to grind it for you. If you have a KitchenAid mixer that takes attachments you can buy yourself a grinder for it and grind meat yourself. If you're a hunter, you probably already have your own grinder.

That's all I can think of off the top of my head right now. I just got back from the store with some things and was thinking this.
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#2
i do everything on that list i also make my own sofrito
morpheus6d9, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Oct 2012.
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#3
If you have the freezer room, stock up on turkeys just after Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas. They can usually be picked up for .59 per pound or less. Just fed six men at deercamp a nice turkey feast for $6. Plus hot turkey sandwiches the next day for lunch. Thats cheap eats right there..
Shooter X, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#4
I'm so fed up with the price of ground beef at the store that I've started buying roasts that are less per pound and grinding them at home. I usually don't buy meat at the grocery store as we butcher a pig every year and buy a quarter of beef but I've been unable to get a quarter of beef yet this year and have been buying our beef retail. That sucks. The only meat I usually buy at the store is poultry and that I only buy when on sale and usually whole birds instead of cuts.

Another thing we do is wait until bread is on sale and then buy a bunch and put it in the freezer until its on sale again.
sleeper78, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#5
sleeper78;54264 Wrote:I'm so fed up with the price of ground beef at the store that I've started buying roasts that are less per pound and grinding them at home. I usually don't buy meat at the grocery store as we butcher a pig every year and buy a quarter of beef but I've been unable to get a quarter of beef yet this year and have been buying our beef retail. That sucks. The only meat I usually buy at the store is poultry and that I only buy when on sale and usually whole birds instead of cuts.

Another thing we do is wait until bread is on sale and then buy a bunch and put it in the freezer until its on sale again.

Baking your own bread is so much more fun though.
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#6
streaker69;54266 Wrote:
sleeper78;54264 Wrote:I'm so fed up with the price of ground beef at the store that I've started buying roasts that are less per pound and grinding them at home. I usually don't buy meat at the grocery store as we butcher a pig every year and buy a quarter of beef but I've been unable to get a quarter of beef yet this year and have been buying our beef retail. That sucks. The only meat I usually buy at the store is poultry and that I only buy when on sale and usually whole birds instead of cuts.

Another thing we do is wait until bread is on sale and then buy a bunch and put it in the freezer until its on sale again.

Baking your own bread is so much more fun though.

Yes it is but having the tree business, a full time job, a wife with a full time job and a 3 month old finding the time to bake it is hard sometimes. We still get to do it a few times a year. Dinner rolls, soft pretzels, hand made loaves, and bread machine loaves. Plus pizza and stromboli but not enough to live off of.
sleeper78, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#7
I just bought 2 spiral cut smoked hams at Giant for $1.29/pound.As with the turkeys just after Easter, hams just after Christmas go on sale. Regular price was $3.99/pound, the smaller one was regularly priced at $28.45 and the bigger one was regularly priced at $34.23, I walked away with both of them for $20.27. I cut the 7 pound one up for snacks and sandwiches and put the 8½ pound one in the freezer for Easter.
There are three types of people in the world:
Those who make things happen,
Those who watch things happen,
And those who wonder what happened.
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#8
I had some Dewalt battery packs rebuilt a few years ago because they wouldn't hold a charge anymore. Shortly after getting them back they stopped charging fully. Went out and picked up another new battery just so I had something to use. Decided to tear these apart and see if there's anything obviously wrong with them.

All the welds for the battery cells look good, the thermister solder joints look good. Problem was the contacts on the negative side as well as the thermister contact where it connects to the tool or charger were completely black. A little bit of emery paper shined them up and now both battery packs charge properly.

Something to think about for your tools, you may not need a new battery pack, might just need to clean the contacts. I don't know about other brands, but the Dewalt 18v and larger battery packs can be easily disassembled with a torx screw driver. The smaller packs, I don't think can be dis-assembled as easily.
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#9
Been doing a little bit of looking into food costs and such here of late. Figured I'd see how much it costs to make things from scratch vs buying items prepared in the stores. Obviously there's going to be a difference there, I think we all know that, but do you realize how much of a difference that is?

I just got done figuring out the normal batch of pizza dough that I make, which produces two large 16" pizzas or 6 personal size pizzas. For all the ingredients, it comes out to 70 cents/batch. I know you can't buy prepared dough in the store for anywhere close to that. Granted, that doesn't take into account any electricity that you may use during the process. But I think it's definitely worth it to look into how much it costs and how much you actually save taking a little more time out of your day and making things yourself.
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