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Storing/preserving hot water?
#1
During the recent power outage I gave some thought to the logistics of heating water. I was making instant coffee and hot chocolate for my family, and had calculated how much water I needed for four cups, then heated just that amount of water.

I then began to thing that during a more prolonged situation, heating water may become a routine daily chore, and perhaps it would be best to heat a larger amount and try to preserve that, rather than having to heat water every time you wanted to use some. My work thermos is only 40 ozs., but it will keep soup/tea/etc. pretty hot for as long as 24 hours. I wonder if there are containers other than your typical thermoses and carafes that could be used to store heated water for a day or so?

Thoughts?
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#2
Anything that's designed to keep stuff cold is also designed to keep stuff hot. I bet if you looked around you could find a large drink cooler that you could fill with hot water.
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#3
streaker69;34836 Wrote:Anything that's designed to keep stuff cold is also designed to keep stuff hot. I bet if you looked around you could find a large drink cooler that you could fill with hot water.

I actually have one of those, and I know "insulated" works either way. I guess I just thought for some reason that a foam insulated drink cooler wouldn't do as good of a job as my double-walled thermos. Guess I should do an experiment.

In general, what are your thoughts on the concept of heating once a day and preserving for later use, assuming that too is done efficiently?
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#4
gnbrotz;34841 Wrote:
streaker69;34836 Wrote:Anything that's designed to keep stuff cold is also designed to keep stuff hot. I bet if you looked around you could find a large drink cooler that you could fill with hot water.

I actually have one of those, and I know "insulated" works either way. I guess I just thought for some reason that a foam insulated drink cooler wouldn't do as good of a job as my double-walled thermos. Guess I should do an experiment.

In general, what are your thoughts on the concept of heating once a day and preserving for later use, assuming that too is done efficiently?

I don't see a problem with it, initially heating it is going to be the problem. You'd need a way to heat that much water. For me, I'd use my woodstove and just put a large 32 quart pot directly on the top, I could probably get that boiling in about 20 minutes. If you have a campstove, you could probably do 16 quarts at a time on one of them using LP or camp fuel.

If you have a kerosene heater, I've seen people put pans of water on the tops of them. You'd probably want to avoid using electricity to heat it though, save that for your appliances.
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#5
Heat it in a turkey fryer. Dump it in a 54-qt cooler or 5-gal Igloo drink cooler.
You can experiment the effects of wrapping the exterior with fiberglass and foil to enhance the cooler's insulation.
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#6
I don't know the answer to this, but I would think it would be more efficient to just heat what you need, when you need it. Also cuts down on the amount of storage containers needed, and space for said containers.

Now, if you have a wood stove for heat, forget about storing, just keep a pot full of water on the stove.
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#7
ivwarrior;34844 Wrote:I don't know the answer to this, but I would think it would be more efficient to just heat what you need, when you need it. Also cuts down on the amount of storage containers needed, and space for said containers.

Now, if you have a wood stove for heat, forget about storing, just keep a pot full of water on the stove.

Just as a reference to this, I currently have a pot of water on my woodstove sitting on a metal trivet. It's currently maintaining 133F with no lid on it. If I take it off the trivet, it'll be boiling within a couple of minutes.
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#8
Sterno. Heat as you need it. If you want to use it for a shower or bath, then you may need napalm.
Shrug Ive got my eyes on you
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#9
ivwarrior;34844 Wrote:I don't know the answer to this, but I would think it would be more efficient to just heat what you need, when you need it. Also cuts down on the amount of storage containers needed, and space for said containers.

Now, if you have a wood stove for heat, forget about storing, just keep a pot full of water on the stove.

That was my thought as well. I think if it were "doable" there would be products available for that purpose. Although I can't see much demand for it, so maybe not.

I'd imagine that hot water cools faster than cold water gets warm (room temp). I'd assume combating that heat loss would be tough - depends on what you define as "hot".
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#10
As a side note, for coffee, just get a stovetop percolator and then use it on your camp stove....
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