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Tanto Blades ?
#1
What is the purpose of the tanto blade? Are there any specific uses for it?  I have alwas stuck with a traditional blade and I have never thought  "you know a tanto would be better."
das, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#2
I'm pretty sure they are for mall ninjas.
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#3
They claim that they can penetrate a bullet proof vest, but my own informal tests posted here in the knife forum makes me doubt that very seriously.

I think they mostly just look cool. Very cool. But no real advantage. I'm an M7 fan.
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#4
(09-14-2012, 09:28 AM)Valorius Wrote: They claim that they can penetrate a bullet proof vest, but my own informal tests posted here in the knife forum makes me doubt that very seriously.

I think they mostly just look cool. Very cool. But no real advantage. I'm an M7 fan.
I was kind of thinking that. They just look cool no real advantage over a conventional blade.
das, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#5
But if you like them, i wouldn't say not to use them. Nothing wrong with looking cool. My brother has a really nice Tanto that i'd be happy to own.
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#6
They're supposed to be better for stabbing.  That doesn't mean through a bullet resistant or stab resistant vest, just stabbing in general.  They can also be useful for prying motions as well, if you're willing to risk damaging the blade.  Otherwise you're usually better off with a clip point since it tends to give a larger usable cutting surface on the blade.

Not to say tanto pointed knives aren't useful.  I got pretty handy with one that was gifted to me.  It just takes less practice to be able to easily use a clip point knife for general purpose needs.

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#7
They're crap; they're not even really 'tanto' blades. The closest thing you'll find on the market to a real tango are the Hissatsu series knives, designed by James Williams and produced by CRKT. The profiles of those knives are as close to a real tanto as you're gonna get. The chisel tipped variant was popularized by Cold Steel Knives. They don't offer the same practical profile as other knives do, and traditional tanto profiles offer better penetration than the American chisel point style does. I was able to penetrate 1" thick plywood with a Hissatsu with no point deformation, and pinched holes in a steel drum with it, with the same results. Traditional tantos were designed to penetrate light armor (made from hardened leather, bamboo, and iron), and bone. There is really no "point" to American tantos.
Unbanned since September 2012.
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#8
(09-14-2012, 11:37 AM)jahwarrior72 Wrote: They're crap; they're not even really 'tanto' blades. The closest thing you'll find on the market to a real tango are the Hissatsu series knives, designed by James Williams and produced by CRKT. The profiles of those knives are as close to a real tanto as you're gonna get. The chisel tipped variant was popularized by Cold Steel Knives. They don't offer the same practical profile as other knives do, and traditional tanto profiles offer better penetration than the American chisel point style does. I was able to penetrate 1" thick plywood with a Hissatsu with no point deformation, and pinched holes in a steel drum with it, with the same results. Traditional tantos were designed to penetrate light armor (made from hardened leather, bamboo, and iron), and bone. There is really no "point" to American tantos.

Any thoughts on the Besh Wedge blades?
Interdum feror cupidine partium magnarum Europae vincendarum
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#9
(09-14-2012, 12:19 PM)Warpt762x39 Wrote:
(09-14-2012, 11:37 AM)jahwarrior72 Wrote: They're crap; they're not even really 'tanto' blades. The closest thing you'll find on the market to a real tango are the Hissatsu series knives, designed by James Williams and produced by CRKT. The profiles of those knives are as close to a real tanto as you're gonna get. The chisel tipped variant was popularized by Cold Steel Knives. They don't offer the same practical profile as other knives do, and traditional tanto profiles offer better penetration than the American chisel point style does. I was able to penetrate 1" thick plywood with a Hissatsu with no point deformation, and pinched holes in a steel drum with it, with the same results. Traditional tantos were designed to penetrate light armor (made from hardened leather, bamboo, and iron), and bone. There is really no "point" to American tantos.

Any thoughts on the Besh Wedge blades?


I've never used one, so I couldn't give a fair or informed opinion. I've seen them, and I don't quite get the point of that profile, but that could just be a failing on my part.

It might've been unfair of me to call American tantos crap. A sharp edge is useful, no matter what the profile is. I just don't see them as being better at anything than any other knife. I had one, years ago, and used it for work, because the tip was reinforced. I didn't use it for anything else, though, because it was useless for day-to-day chores.

Almost all my knives can be used for any setting, whether it's self-defense, food prep/cooking, or all-around utility use. The two exceptions are my Hissatsu, and a karambit from 5.11, the Journeyman. Both are strictly violence-oriented knives. I carry the karambit off-hand for weapon retention. Still, it does see action peeling/paring fruits and vegetables, and trimming flowers in the garden; its origins are agrarian, and it's still found being used on farms on Indonesia and Malaysia.
Unbanned since September 2012.
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#10
I like them. I carry a Kershaw brawler for work and Kershaw Leek with drop point blade in my pocket. The brawler is a tough and sturdy knife.
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