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The ultimate grid down tool kit
#1
I'm just wondering if the grid were to go completely down and you no longer had the use of power tools what sort of things would you put in say a "fix anything" toolkit you could fit comfortably in a backpack or in a small box in the back of a car. I'm looking to see out there if anyone would add anything interesting that I don't know about or hadn't considered.

I would start off with a smooth jaw 10" Knipex plier wrench. They're made to be indestructible, last a lifetime, and take the place of several tools. I'd also include a pair of Irwin vise grips.

[Image: 245849f4a1d577fe86d4114a9bba5d50.jpg]

[Image: Irwin-Vise-Grip-4-inch-Curved-Jaw-Plier-P14006945.jpg]

I recently also started switching my car toolkits over to tool rolls instead of bags. Much more transportable, take up less space and when you open the roll everything is right there. There is no digging into the bottom of a toolbag or toolbox looking for that one thing. They're so much faster and easier to use.

[Image: DSC01314.jpg]

^ not my kit just put it there for illustrative purposes.
The forum poster formerly known as Emoticon...
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#2
barb wire fence pliers come in handy, it has a cutter, hammer and a twister on it. a woodsman axe and a machete would be packed as well
"Fighting for peace is like screwing for virginity"

goofin, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Sep 2012.
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#3
Well, "grid down" would be a shit sandwich, and you could immediately chuck most of your kit because electrics and plumbing won't work. Cars, maybe.

I can tell you that if the grid goes down it does matter how... because that radically changes things. A big hammer, axe, bow saw with spare blades, chisels and two good sharpening stones would help you build a shelter and make firewood, too.

I have been thinking a lot about this lately, thanks to the book One Second After.

I support the idea that everywhere within 500 miles of the coast is going to be borked. Staying put is a lousy idea. But I live right next to a Lowes and two grocery stores and at least have a plan, which I am certain the majority of my neighbors do not.
tolerance for failure meter... LOW
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#4
Duct tape.
[Image: picsay-1358258813.jpg]
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#5
My first thought was, "Find the nearest Amish and take their toolbox." but since they're a good 50 miles away and likely armed I'll go with this:

A hand brace. (The original cordless drill) This is a pic of the one I use which is kind a nice since it ratchets too.

[Image: s46y4k.jpg]

10K mentioned a bow saw/axe which would be high on my list too. I hoard fasteners like nails, screws, nuts and bolts. It has nothing to do with prepping, I just always seem to pick up a box of something when I'm at the HD.

Edit: I just noticed that I didn't crop the photo and sure enough there's a bag of nuts on the desk. (and on the floor if you look close)
Ammunition, it's the new lead bullion. Buy it cheap and stack it deep.
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#6
Ten*K;147179 Wrote:Well, "grid down" would be a shit sandwich, and you could immediately chuck most of your kit because electrics and plumbing won't work. Cars, maybe.

I can tell you that if the grid goes down it does matter how... because that radically changes things. A big hammer, axe, bow saw with spare blades, chisels and two good sharpening stones would help you build a shelter and make firewood, too.

I have been thinking a lot about this lately, thanks to the book One Second After.

I support the idea that everywhere within 500 miles of the coast is going to be borked. Staying put is a lousy idea. But I live right next to a Lowes and two grocery stores and at least have a plan, which I am certain the majority of my neighbors do not.

During grid down even if it were an EMP, or massive flare there's still going to be some "dumb" diesel engines out there not loaded with computers or electronics that will be just fine and even some generator rigs in building basements that would be good fuel sources if you had the right tools. Stuff that is a few stories down buried under several layers of underground concrete parking structures which should be largely intact.

Rik Bitter;147201 Wrote:My first thought was, "Find the nearest Amish and take their toolbox." but since their a good 50 miles away and likely armed I'll go with this:

A hand brace. (The original cordless drill) This is a pic of the one I use which is kind a nice since it ratchets too.

10K mentioned a bow saw/axe which would be high on my list too. I hoard fasteners like nails, screws, nuts and bolts. It has nothing to do with prepping, I just always seem to pick up a box of something when I'm at the HD.

Edit: I just noticed that I didn't crop the photo and sure enough there's a bag of nuts on the desk. (and on the floor if you look close)

I really like the estwing camper's short axe it's kind of in between a full size axe and a hatchet. Big enough that you could bring down a small tree without the effort a hatchet would require. I've been thinking about picking one up for a long time. I like how the head and handle are one solid piece. I have about 10 estwings most of them 2/3rds of them are rock hammers, but I've never had a problem with any of them. Two of them I found in the dirt in the field after god only knows how long they had been out there a little sandpaper and oil and they're good as new. Anything estwing is will worth the premium because as long as you take care of it, it will last you a lifetime and probably your kid's lifetimes as well.

[Image: AO_campers_axe.jpg]
The forum poster formerly known as Emoticon...
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#7
I carry a camp axe, an entrenching tool, a fairly large knife, and a Gerber multitool in my vehicle at all times.
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DeadEye, proud to be a member of pa2a.org since Jun 2013.
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#8
If you're talking about a "scavenging" kit, then there's a few things you should have. Heavy Bolt cutters, round non-sparking cold chisel, 2.5lb hand sledge. Hack saw, just in case the black guy drops the key down the drain, reversible screw driver (2 sizes flat and phillips) and crow/pry bars. Hatchet with a hammer side is always helpful.
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#9
These look pretty damn cool. I bet you could make quick work of chainlink and barbed wire with them, don't take up much space either like standard bolt cutters...The video shows them going though fairly heavy chain considering the size of the tool.



The forum poster formerly known as Emoticon...
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#10
Brace, a selection of cross cut saws.
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