pa2a.org


Share Thread:  
Used Compound Bows
#1
I happened across a pair of used compound bows in a shop the other week. I couldn't get a close look at them to identify what brand or any other details. They were both a little dinged up, looks like mostly cosmetic issues. But I was wondering what in particular should I look for if I were to consider buying them? Mostly in regards to places where there might be hidden damage. I've only shot recurves before, so venturing into compounds is something new to me.
Reply
#2
streaker69;130229 Wrote:I happened across a pair of used compound bows in a shop the other week. I couldn't get a close look at them to identify what brand or any other details. They were both a little dinged up, looks like mostly cosmetic issues. But I was wondering what in particular should I look for if I were to consider buying them? Mostly in regards to places where there might be hidden damage. I've only shot recurves before, so venturing into compounds is something new to me.

The most important thing is to get properly measured by a store employee!!! Once you get properly measured and you know which size bow you need, then look at draw weight. If you want to do hunting, then anything between 50 lbs to 70 lbs should work best (you'll have adequate range and power to put down the deer humanely as possible). I haven't hunted with mine yet, but I keep mine at 60 lbs for practice. Also once you choose a bow, ask the store employee to suggest arrow lengths. Walmart sells carbon arrows at a very low price that should work fine. Same goes for target tips. Most gun/archery shops can install your kisser and rear peep sight for you. I'm still an amateur, but it does get very addicting.

Edit: Also get a wrist guard. Some amateurs/novice bow shooters hit their wrist upon release. My girlfriend did that twice before. Her arm had two black and blue marks for almost a month, and she was in a lot of pain after doing it. Again, Walmart sells them fairly cheap. Also get your trigger release from Walmart too. Like firearms, it is a decent investment to initially start up in.
[Image: pa_zps59e4c512.png?t=1379682235]
Reply
#3
streaker69;130229 Wrote:I happened across a pair of used compound bows in a shop the other week. I couldn't get a close look at them to identify what brand or any other details. They were both a little dinged up, looks like mostly cosmetic issues. But I was wondering what in particular should I look for if I were to consider buying them? Mostly in regards to places where there might be hidden damage. I've only shot recurves before, so venturing into compounds is something new to me.

Usually if they're in a shop (Archery shop) there shouldn't be any issues. If a compound bow fails it does so in a spectacular fashion and would be very obvious. As a once over, inspect the limbs for any cracks along with the cams, (I would be surprised if you find any) also inspect the string and cables for any fraying. The string and how it was maintained (look for evidence of string wax) is usually a pretty good indicator of how the rest was taken care of. As far as dings and such, they're pretty common on a bow that saw any kind of use. I wouldn't worry much about it. Other than that you'll need to spend a little making adjustments so it suits you. Since your new to it, start out at the lowest draw weight and work up from there. Just because the bow can have a 65# draw weight doesn't mean that is where it'll perform best at.
It's a lot of trial, error, & practice.
Reply
#4
P89;130293 Wrote:
streaker69;130229 Wrote:I happened across a pair of used compound bows in a shop the other week. I couldn't get a close look at them to identify what brand or any other details. They were both a little dinged up, looks like mostly cosmetic issues. But I was wondering what in particular should I look for if I were to consider buying them? Mostly in regards to places where there might be hidden damage. I've only shot recurves before, so venturing into compounds is something new to me.

Usually if they're in a shop (Archery shop) there shouldn't be any issues. If a compound bow fails it does so in a spectacular fashion and would be very obvious. As a once over, inspect the limbs for any cracks along with the cams, (I would be surprised if you find any) also inspect the string and cables for any fraying. The string and how it was maintained (look for evidence of string wax) is usually a pretty good indicator of how the rest was taken care of. As far as dings and such, they're pretty common on a bow that saw any kind of use. I wouldn't worry much about it. Other than that you'll need to spend a little making adjustments so it suits you. Since your new to it, start out at the lowest draw weight and work up from there. Just because the bow can have a 65# draw weight doesn't mean that is where it'll perform best at.
It's a lot of trial, error, & practice.

Are bows generally adjustable in draw weight?
Reply
#5
streaker69;130294 Wrote:
P89;130293 Wrote:Usually if they're in a shop (Archery shop) there shouldn't be any issues. If a compound bow fails it does so in a spectacular fashion and would be very obvious. As a once over, inspect the limbs for any cracks along with the cams, (I would be surprised if you find any) also inspect the string and cables for any fraying. The string and how it was maintained (look for evidence of string wax) is usually a pretty good indicator of how the rest was taken care of. As far as dings and such, they're pretty common on a bow that saw any kind of use. I wouldn't worry much about it. Other than that you'll need to spend a little making adjustments so it suits you. Since your new to it, start out at the lowest draw weight and work up from there. Just because the bow can have a 65# draw weight doesn't mean that is where it'll perform best at.
It's a lot of trial, error, & practice.

Are bows generally adjustable in draw weight?

Yes. Depending on make, model, etc. could be anywhere from 50# to 70#...that's pretty typical for a hunting bow.
Reply
#6
If they're not currently strung, or if the string needs replaced what does that generally cost to have done at a shop?
Reply
#7
Depends on a lot of things...strings can be anywhere from $20 to $100, then shops labor charge.
One thing to look for when inspecting the cams is look at the groove the string rides in carefully. If there is chunks missing there's been a string derailment...this could be from dry firing or improper adjustments made by a novice.
Reply
#8
Keep in mind when you are figuring out what draw weight is comfortable for you, that the weight is going to increase when you take the bow outside in freezing temperatures and the limbs stiffen up.

Check for cracks in the limbs, look visually and run your fingers down them feeling for cracks. Some people say to rub it with a cotton ball or cotton swap to see if there are any splinters that grab the cotton, but I think you would feel that with your finger.

Don't worry too much about the string, if it's bad just buy a new one. The shop around here (Tanners) will install anything you buy for free, so I'm assuming that most places probably have the same policy. Either way, make sure to keep the string waxed.

Lastly, check what accessories it comes with to see if it's a good deal. Some bows might look cheap, but if they come with absolutely nothing it might not be worth it. My bow was only $225, but after I added a rest, sight, quiver, release, 6 arrows and 3 broadheads, I was pushing $700. It adds up fast.
Reply
#9
This is the same shop where I found the old binoculars I posted about in another thread, so I'm kind of hoping to get a really good deal. I'm going to try to get up there this weekend to take a look at them, see if they're worth buying.

ETA: I emailed the shop to see if they'll give me make/model/price of them. I'll post back if I get a reply.
Reply
#10
I stopped up at the shop today to take a look at the bows they had. There was actually three in the window. One was a Bear, the other I couldn't find a brand name, the the third didn't have a brand either, but it was done up in a home made camo job. The Bear and the second one both needed completely restrung, the third one the string was in good shape, the rest of it was in decent shape with some minor issues. It draws smooths, I'm guessing around a 50lb draw. Doing some research on it, it's a Martin PackRat bow circa 1987. If this is the correct one, it's supposed to be able to be broken down and carried in a pack.

Not a bad deal for $35 since I've found them selling for much more.
Reply






Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Red dot sights for compound bows? WHAAAAAT???? Mr_Gixxer 8 4,310 03-15-2014, 04:37 PM
Last Post: spblademaker
  Picatinny rail stabilizer for compound bow!!! Mr_Gixxer 4 3,080 03-13-2014, 09:32 PM
Last Post: Mr_Gixxer



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Software by MyBB, © 2002-2015 MyBB Group.
Template by Modogodo Design.